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Big names at surprising prices

Build your contemporary collection with accessibly priced works by the art world’s leading lights, from Basquiat to Murakami — offered in our First Open | online  and Damien Hirst: 3,575½ Spots (and Three Small Mickeys), Online sales

  • 1
  • Jean-Michel Basquiat

Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988), Untitled, 1981. Oilstick on paper. 11 x 7 in (27.9 x 17.8 cm). This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity issued by the authentication committee of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Estimate $50,000-70,000. This lot is offered in First Open  Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988), Untitled, 1981. Oilstick on paper. 11 x 7 in (27.9 x 17.8 cm). This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity issued by the authentication committee of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Estimate: $50,000-70,000. This lot is offered in First Open | Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Executed in colourful bursts of red and blue, this work on paper hails from Jean-Michel Basquiat’s celebrated series of ‘Famous Negro Athletes’. The artist depicts a baseball player with a cap and bat, perhaps portraying the groundbreaking athlete Hank Aaron, whom Basquiat often referenced in his work. Challenging Western histories, Basquiat honoured black men as heroes and kings, signified by the crown in the upper left.

  • 2
  • Sam Francis

Sam Francis (1923-1994), Untitled. Gouache and watercolor on paper. 9¾ x 18¾ in (24.8 x 47.6 cm). Estimate                    $18,000-25,000. This lot is offered in First Open  Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Sam Francis (1923-1994), Untitled. Gouache and watercolor on paper. 9¾ x 18¾ in (24.8 x 47.6 cm). Estimate: $18,000-25,000. This lot is offered in First Open | Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

For the Californian artist Sam Francis, colour was the real substance, rather than drawing or line. Painted in 1973, Untitled   is taken from his series of ‘grid’ paintings, exhibiting a loose scaffolding of colourful overlying drips. Interestingly, trips to Tokyo during the 1970s fostered Francis’s interest in the calligraphic nature of paint, visible in this work on paper.

  • 3
  • Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn (b. 1968), Untitled (Butterfly), 2003. Coloured pencil on paper. 17 x 14 in (43.2 x 35.6 cm). Estimate $150,000-200,000. This lot is offered in First Open  Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Mark Grotjahn (b. 1968), Untitled (Butterfly), 2003. Coloured pencil on paper. 17 x 14 in (43.2 x 35.6 cm). Estimate: $150,000-200,000. This lot is offered in First Open | Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

In this meditative example from Mark Grotjahn’s sought-after ‘Butterfly’ series, the artist concentrates on a radiant motif of brilliantly diverging lines. Fusing past and present through his conflation of off-kilter Renaissance perspective and hard-edged modernism, Grotjahn evokes a spiritual response using an extremely complex and layered working process.

  • 4
  • John Chamberlain

John Chamberlain (1927-2011), Untitled, 1981. Urethane foam, staples, metal nail and spray acrylic on paper. 6 x 4 x 4 in (15.2 x 10.2 x 10.2 cm). Estimate $6,000-8,000. This lot is offered in First Open  Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

John Chamberlain (1927-2011), Untitled, 1981. Urethane foam, staples, metal nail and spray acrylic on paper. 6 x 4 x 4 in (15.2 x 10.2 x 10.2 cm). Estimate: $6,000-8,000. This lot is offered in First Open | Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

John Chamberlain saw material in other people’s idea of waste, using aluminium pie tins, pieces of automobiles and scrap metal in his abstract and gestural sculptures. Untitled, from 1981, is a rare example of his foam pieces, signed by the artist and distorted by wrapping spray-painted paper around its mid-section. Much like the artist’s distinctive metal sculptures, the result captures Chamberlain’s lifelong interest in the pliability of material.

  • 5
  • Keith Haring

Keith Haring (1958-1990), Untitled. Felt-tip pen on board. 10¾ x 14½ in (27.3 x 36.8 cm). Estimate                    $20,000-30,000. This lot is offered in First Open  Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Keith Haring (1958-1990), Untitled. Felt-tip pen on board. 10¾ x 14½ in (27.3 x 36.8 cm). Estimate: $20,000-30,000. This lot is offered in First Open | Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Executed in the thick outlines that mark Keith Haring’s signature graphic style, Untitled depicts a bulbous many-legged creature whose brain has been replaced by a computer, being ridden by a faceless figure. In today’s tech-obsessed and tech-dependent society, Haring’s image is as prescient as ever before.

  • 6
  • Takashi Murakami

Takashi Murakami (b. 1962), Flower of Joy (Canary Yellow), 2007. Acrylic and platinum leaf on canvas laid down on board. 15¾ x 15¾ x 2⅛ in (40 x 40 x 5.4 cm). Estimate $70,000-100,000. This lot is offered in First Open  Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Takashi Murakami (b. 1962), Flower of Joy (Canary Yellow), 2007. Acrylic and platinum leaf on canvas laid down on board. 15¾ x 15¾ x 2⅛ in (40 x 40 x 5.4 cm). Estimate: $70,000-100,000. This lot is offered in First Open | Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Simultaneously cute and disturbing, Takashi Murakami’s ubiquitous smiling, psychedelic flowers have become synonymous with the artist himself. The subject embodies the concept of kawaii in Japanese popular culture, although when seen in excess, the flowers can also become menacing.

  • 7
  • Sam Gilliam

Sam Gilliam (b. 1933), Canyon #2, 1974. Acrylic on handmade paper. 20⅝ x 26½ in (52.4 x 67.3 cm). Estimate $5,000-7,000. This lot is offered in First Open  Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Sam Gilliam (b. 1933), Canyon #2, 1974. Acrylic on handmade paper. 20⅝ x 26½ in (52.4 x 67.3 cm). Estimate: $5,000-7,000. This lot is offered in First Open | Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Sam Gilliam radicalised the medium of painting in the 1970s, removing the canvas from the stretcher and its support in his famed ‘drape’ paintings. Canyon #2  is representative of Gilliam’s style of pouring and pooling paint onto the surface of the medium, in this case, handmade paper. Prominently placed in this year’s Venice Biennale, Gilliam is also the subject of a career-spanning exhibition at Mnuchin Gallery — the artist’s first New York show in 32 years — and is highly coveted in the art market.

  • 8
  • KAWS

KAWS (b. 1974) & Hajime Sorayama (b. 1947), NO FUTURE COMPANION (Hajime Sorayama Version), 2008. Metallised plastic with box. 13 x 8¼ x 8¼ in (33 x 21 x 21 cm). Estimate                    $8,000-12,000. This lot is offered in First Open  Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

KAWS (b. 1974) & Hajime Sorayama (b. 1947), NO FUTURE COMPANION (Hajime Sorayama Version), 2008. Metallised plastic with box. 13 x 8¼ x 8¼ in (33 x 21 x 21 cm). Estimate: $8,000-12,000. This lot is offered in First Open | Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

KAWS’ street-born, cartoonish iconography, often incorporating figures with X-ed out eyes, has become its own subculture — with collaborators ranging from Kanye West to Marc Jacobs and including limited-edition Air Jordans. His clown-like Companion figures, based on the image of Mickey Mouse, are among his most collectible works.

  • 9
  • George Condo

George Condo (b. 1957), Reclining Seated Female, 1996. Oil on canvas. 12 x 9 in (30.5 x 22.9 cm). Estimate $15,000-20,000. This lot is offered in First Open  Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

George Condo (b. 1957), Reclining Seated Female, 1996. Oil on canvas. 12 x 9 in (30.5 x 22.9 cm). Estimate: $15,000-20,000. This lot is offered in First Open | Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

George Condo’s portraits are at once contemporary and historical, including references from European classicism to American subcultures. In a nod to Picasso’s famed bathers, Condo depicts a faceless figure in a sculptural yet angular form, with arms raised against a red-hot background.

  • 10
  • Sarah Charlesworth

Sarah Charlesworth (1947-2013), Trial by Fire, 1992-93. This work is number five from an edition of six plus two artist’s proofs. Cibachrome print in artists lacquered wood frame. 42½ x 33½ in (108 x 85.1 cm). Estimate $3,000-5,000. This lot is offered in First Open  Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Sarah Charlesworth (1947-2013), Trial by Fire, 1992-93. This work is number five from an edition of six plus two artist’s proofs. Cibachrome print in artist's lacquered wood frame. 42½ x 33½ in (108 x 85.1 cm). Estimate: $3,000-5,000. This lot is offered in First Open | Post-War & Contemporary Art, 7-14 December 2017, Online

Over the course of a 40-year career, Sarah Charlesworth investigated the role that images play in our culture by isolating forms against monochromatic backgrounds. Along with Richard Prince and Cindy Sherman, she was part of a group of artists working in New York City who probed the visual language of mass media and advertising. With a recent career retrospective at the New Museum in New York in 2015, Charlesworth remains an important figure in contemporary photography.

  • 11
  • Damien Hirst

Damien Hirst (b. 1965), Cupric Bromide, from 40 Woodcut Spots, 2012. Woodcut in colours, on Somerset White paper, signed in pencil, numbered 1855 on the reverse (there were also 15 artists proofs), published by The Paragon Press, London. Sheet 6 x 6 in (152 x 152 mm). This lot is offered in Damien Hirst 3,575½ Spots (and Three Small Mickeys), Online, 7-13 December 2017
Damien Hirst (b. 1965), Cupric Bromide, from 40 Woodcut Spots, 2012. Woodcut in colours, on Somerset White paper, signed in pencil, numbered 18/55 on the reverse (there were also 15 artist's proofs), published by The Paragon Press, London. Sheet: 6 x 6 in (152 x 152 mm). This lot is offered in Damien Hirst: 3,575½ Spots (and Three Small Mickeys), Online, 7-13 December 2017

The result of an exacting process, Damien Hirst’s Spot prints pushed the boundaries of the medium. Cupric Bromide, produced in 2012, draws upon this motif, which was first introduced during Hirst’s seminal 1988 Frieze  exhibition and is now considered a hallmark of the artist’s practice.