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Collecting Guide: Old Master drawings

Seven expert tips on collecting Old Master drawings, whether you seek affordable works on paper or a museum-quality masterpiece. Illustrated with works offered in New York on 30 January 2018, as well as examples previously sold at Christie’s

Writing on the importance of drawing, Tintoretto once proclaimed: ‘Beautiful colours can be bought in the shops on the Rialto, but good drawing can only be bought from the casket of the artist’s talent with patient study and nights without sleep.’

In the Early Modern period, aspiring artists were expected to spend their formative years practising drawing from the live model. French and Italian artists travelled to Rome to ape the Old Masters and the ancients, while Dutch artists also headed to Italy, but mainly to draw inspiration from the landscape of the Roman campagna and the incomparable light.

Draughtsmanship was the basis of much creative production whether the artist worked in clay, paint or metal. It’s often said that drawing is the thought of the artist. The painting on the wall is the finished article, but to arrive at this final state, the artist usually has to draw.

Pietro Buonaccorsi, called Perino del Vaga (Florence 1501-1547 Rome), Jupiter Handing a Newborn Boy to Diana. 14½ x 18¼ in (36.8 x 46.2 cm). Estimate $150,000-200,000. This lot is offered in Old Master & British Drawings on 30 January 2018  at Christie’s in New York
Pietro Buonaccorsi, called Perino del Vaga (Florence 1501-1547 Rome), Jupiter Handing a Newborn Boy to Diana. 14½ x 18¼ in (36.8 x 46.2 cm). Estimate: $150,000-200,000. This lot is offered in Old Master & British Drawings on 30 January 2018 at Christie’s in New York
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  • Delve into history

What’s most fascinating about drawings is that, on a blank sheet of paper, the artist reveals himself before your very eyes. In just a few lines, you can see (hopefully!) when — and where — he or she is from.

Old Master Drawings are often intricately linked with the history of the country in which they were produced: 17th-century Holland, for example, was an iconoclastic Protestant country, so there were almost no commissions for religious paintings — and, with no real aristocracy, King or court, most art was bought privately. Drawings of landscapes or genre scenes were often viewed not as sketches but as highly finished works of art. These drawn works tended to feature the artist’s signature, and mirrored Dutch paintings.

Italian drawings, however, show the influence of the Church, which played a huge role in artistic patronage. The important commissions the Church gave required extensive preparation, and a significant number of Old Master drawings from that country are in fact studies of figures and compositional sketches for larger works. The same is often true of French drawing, although in the 17th century the disciplines of French Classicism meant drawings in that tradition were less Baroque than their freer Italian counterparts, which conveyed a greater sense of movement.

Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (Venice 1727-1804), God the Father in the Clouds Supported by Angels. 10 x 7½ in (24.5 x 17.9 cm). Estimate $25,000-35,000. This lot is offered in Old Master & British Drawings on 30 January 2018  at Christie’s in New York
Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (Venice 1727-1804), God the Father in the Clouds Supported by Angels. 10 x 7½ in (24.5 x 17.9 cm). Estimate: $25,000-35,000. This lot is offered in Old Master & British Drawings on 30 January 2018 at Christie’s in New York
Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (Venice 1727-1804), Fame with Angels and Putti in the Sky. 11⅛ x 7⅞ in (20 x 28.3 cm). Estimate $7,000-10,000. This lot is offered in Old Master & British Drawings on 30 January 2018  at Christie’s in New York
Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (Venice 1727-1804), Fame with Angels and Putti in the Sky. 11⅛ x 7⅞ in (20 x 28.3 cm). Estimate: $7,000-10,000. This lot is offered in Old Master & British Drawings on 30 January 2018 at Christie’s in New York
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  • Familiarise yourself with artists’ preferred techniques

Typically, 16th and 17th-century artists would begin a larger work by quickly sketching their intended composition in pen and ink, often over unobtrusive indications in black chalk. Drawings made with a rapidly wielded pen were ideal for exploring an initial idea.

For greater precision, artists used chalk to more carefully depict individual figures, and to study the fall of light and shadow. Blue paper worked well with chalk — with artists often choosing two shades from black, white or red, and sometimes all three.

Once these initial sketches had been made, an artist would move on to the modello, a finished study close to the final composition, and this would often be submitted to the patron for approval. These might even have to be squared, to allow the artist to transfer a composition to canvas more easily — or, in the case of a fresco, to the wall.

Pieter van Bloemen, called Standaart (Antwerp 1657-1720), A Mounted Cavalier, Seen from Behind. Point of the brush and black ink, grey wash. Sold for £253,250 on 8 December 2014
Pieter van Bloemen, called Standaart (Antwerp 1657-1720), A Mounted Cavalier, Seen from Behind. Point of the brush and black ink, grey wash. Sold for £253,250 on 8 December 2014
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  • A drawing can be more important than the artist who made it

In the field of Italian drawing, most collectors look for depictions of the figure, while, for Dutch drawings, landscapes tend to be most popular. But there are always multiple exceptions, such as Rembrandt’s wonderful figure drawings, which are very much sought after. When looking at a drawing, consider its quality, not its adherence to a particular theme. The object itself is important, sometimes even more so than the artist.

For example, we recently sold a drawing of a cavalier by Pieter van Bloemen, a rather minor Dutch artist of the 17th century (see above). Everyone who saw it loved it. Everything was perfect in condition and composition; it had a special kind of charm. It sold for £253,250, well above its estimate of £3,000 to 5,000. The record price for a van Bloemen before then was around £4,000 and similar drawings have since sold for less than £10,000, but this drawing was special.

Luca Cambiaso (Genoa 1527-1585 Madrid), A Seated Warrior. Pen and brown ink, 6¼ x 4¼ in (15.8 x 10.8 cm). This lot was offered in Old Master & British Drawings on 5 July 2016 at Christie’s in London and sold for £8,125

Luca Cambiaso (Genoa 1527-1585 Madrid), A Seated Warrior. Pen and brown ink, 6¼ x 4¼ in (15.8 x 10.8 cm). This lot was offered in Old Master & British Drawings on 5 July 2016 at Christie’s in London and sold for £8,125

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  • Old Masters can be affordable

Works we have sold range in price from £700 to £26,000,000. Yet over 90 per cent of drawings have a market value of less than £10,000 — only a very small proportion are worth a fortune. It is absolutely possible to find very good drawings from good, well-known artists for £4,000–5,000.

You can find a perfectly nice little drawing executed by Cambiaso, which is a study for an important ceiling decoration, for less than £10,000 (see above), or even a little Jean-Louis-André-Théodore Géricault. The students and followers of Ingres working in the 19th century, such as Alexandre-Jean-Baptiste Hesse, Savinien Petit and Félix-Joseph Barrias were gifted technicians whose beautiful drawings sell for around £1,000 to £1,500, sometimes less.

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  • Look out for suspicious signatures

The signatures you see on drawings can often be inauthentic, or misleading, later additions to the works. The number of drawings attributed to Raphael or Michelangelo is enormous. That is where a connection to a finished painting is important, and you should be ready to pay something of a premium where the attribution is beyond doubt. We use our eyes, consult literature and ask the opinions of external scholars.

Raffaello Sanzio, called Raphael (1483-1520), Head of a Muse. Black chalk over pounce marks, traces of stylus, watermark encircled Saint Anthony’s cross. Sold for £29,161,250 on 8 December 2009
Raffaello Sanzio, called Raphael (1483-1520), Head of a Muse. Black chalk over pounce marks, traces of stylus, watermark encircled Saint Anthony’s cross. Sold for £29,161,250 on 8 December 2009
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  • Store drawings with care

The value of a drawing can be decreased ten-fold if its condition is poor. Exposure to sunlight leads to fading and discoloration of the paper, and the ink tends to sink in to the paper and damage it. This used to mean a collector could not always enjoy a collection on his or her walls. But today there are ways to avoid damage from the light such as the use of UV-resistant glass, even though one must always treat them with care.

Drawings can also suffer from insects such as silverfish that eat the paper. Depending on the medium, humidity can also be a problem. For others, it is storage that has been an issue: drawings can be found folded, or with smudged portions, having been left unframed and unprotected.

But let’s not paint too gloomy a picture — most drawings have survived the test of time surprisingly well. We have worked with some extraordinarily well-preserved works, such as Raphael’s Head of a Muse (see above). It would be a highlight of any collection as a direct study — a cartoon as we call it — for the Parnassus, one of the artist’s great frescoes in the Vatican. We sold it in 2009, exactly 500 years after it was made. Since it had always been kept in great collections such as those of Sir Joshua Reynolds and King William II of Holland, Prince of Orange, it has most probably always been cherished.

Claude Gillot (Langres 1673-1722 Paris), Study for Scaramouche, His Arms Outstretched. 9⅛ x 12¼ in (23.2 x 31 cm). Estimate $50,000-70,000. This lot is offered in Old Master & British Drawings on 30 January 2018  at Christie’s in New York
Claude Gillot (Langres 1673-1722 Paris), Study for Scaramouche, His Arms Outstretched. 9⅛ x 12¼ in (23.2 x 31 cm). Estimate: $50,000-70,000. This lot is offered in Old Master & British Drawings on 30 January 2018 at Christie’s in New York
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  • Hold it in your hands

People are afraid of entering drawings departments in museums because they feel they are reserved for scholars. This is not true — most of them are open to the public. Visiting museum collections gives you the opportunity to see drawings unframed, just mounted: that is the best way to approach them. You used to be able to go to the British Museum unannounced and see whatever you wanted. The rules have changed now, but you can still explore the far reaches of the collection if you write to them two weeks in advance. The same applies to many European and American collections.

England has incredible drawing collections at the British Museum, Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum and Cambridge’s Fitzwilliam Museum, and Scotland has treasures too. In Europe, visit the Louvre in Paris, Florence’s Uffizi, and Holland’s Rijksmuseum, which has an especially beautiful collection of Dutch drawings. The United States has New York’s Metropolitan Museum, the Getty Museum, the National Gallery of Washington, and the Art Institute of Chicago, among others.

There is something very immediate about a drawing, and you only get a sense of its physicality when you have it in your hands.