Why it’s time to discover Russian art

A panel of leading experts discuss the key figures in Russian art over the past century and more — Malevich, Fabergé, Ovchinnikov, Deineka, Vrubel and others, illustrated with lots in our 5 June sale in London and works previously sold at Christie’s

The year 2017 marks the centenary of the Russian Revolution, which ended more than 300 years of Tsarist rule and led to the emergence of the Soviet Union. In its immediate aftermath, the potential for radical artistic innovation in Russia seemed boundless — but this was not to last.

In the art world, the centenary is a moment to take stock of the trajectory of Russian art from the turn of the 20th century up to the present day. Ahead of our Russian Art  sale in London on 5 June, we asked five key Russian art specialists from museums and galleries around the world to tell us about their favourite Russian artists; which Russian masters they feel have been overlooked; and their must-see locations for viewing Russian art, in Moscow and beyond.

In your opinion, which Russian artist is, or has been, most under-appreciated?

Zelfira Tregulova, Director General, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow: ‘I think that Russian art is underestimated in general. This applies to all periods of its development. The market just snatched a dozen names that sell well from a vast heritage and that it is not always a real measure of the significance of this artist's work in the history of art. Artists of the first half of the 19th century are consistently undervalued; for example, a figure like Alexander Ivanov. Market prices for individual works of Serov do not compensate for the general underestimation of his work. Vrubel, Deineka; there are many such examples.’

Anton Belov, Director, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art: ‘Other than Ilya Kabakov, all Russian artists are under-appreciated. Taking into account the weak market for Russian art, it’s an ideal time to buy key works by contemporary artists and the nonconformist artists of the 1960s.’

Dmitri Plavinsky (1937-2012), Church. Oil, acrylic and pencil on panel, 33¾ x 21½ in (86 x 54.7 cm). Estimate £20,000-30,000. This lot is offered in Russian Art on 5 June 2017 at Christie’s in London, King Street

Dmitri Plavinsky (1937-2012), Church. Oil, acrylic and pencil on panel, 33¾ x 21½ in (86 x 54.7 cm). Estimate: £20,000-30,000. This lot is offered in Russian Art on 5 June 2017 at Christie’s in London, King Street

Gvido Trepsa, Executive Director, Nicholas Roerich Museum, New York: ‘Varvara Stepanova, wife of Aleksander Rodchenko, was as talented and influential as any of her fellow Constructivists. Her work in posters, typography, textiles and theatre still makes its mark on modern graphic design. From her androgynous sports costumes to her layouts in the literary art journal LEF, her multi-disciplinary approach merits greater standing among the avant-garde elite.’

Varvara Stepanova (1894-1958), Three Figures, 1921. Sold for £41,825 on 24 June 2004 at Christie’s London

Varvara Stepanova (1894-1958), Three Figures, 1921. Sold for £41,825 on 24 June 2004 at Christie’s London

Ann Dumas, Curator, Royal Academy of Arts: ‘For me, Alexander Deineka is the most important and interesting Russian artist of the Soviet period, yet he is not well known in the West. We have nine works by him in the Royal Academy’s exhibition Revolution: Russian Art 1917-1932, including probably his most famous painting, The Defence of Petrograd (1928), and Construction of New Workshops (1928), Textile Workers (1927) and Race (1932).

‘Although Deineka’s powerful figurative style satisfied the Soviet authorities’ demand for art that could be readily understood by the masses, he by no means simply followed a realist formula. He drew on a wide range of influences, such as avant-garde Constructivist art, film, photo-montage, and advertising that he brilliantly fused in his highly original paintings.’

A silver-mounted en plein and cloisonné enamel cut-glass dish marked Khlebnikov with the Imperial Warrant, Moscow 1908-1917. 13¼ in (33.6 cm) long. Estimate £20,000-30,000. This work is offered in the Russian Art sale on 5 June at Christies London

A silver-mounted en plein and cloisonné enamel cut-glass dish marked Khlebnikov with the Imperial Warrant, Moscow 1908-1917. 13¼ in (33.6 cm) long. Estimate: £20,000-30,000. This work is offered in the Russian Art sale on 5 June at Christie's London

Wilfried Zeisler, Curator of Russian & 19th Century Art, Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens: ‘I have always been interested in decorative arts, Russian art, and its interactions with Western art. Exhibitions and auctions of Russian art often feature jewellery by Fabergé, Ovchinnikov and Khlebnikov. These firms were large businesses managed by successful entrepreneurs. However, I am always fascinated by the creations of smaller ateliers, which worked in a more traditional way with a master at the head of the workshop, surrounded by a few workers and apprentices.

An impressive gem-set silver kovsh and ladle. Marked K. Fabergé with the Imperial warrant, Moscow, 1899-1908. The kovsh 13⅝ in (34.6 cm) high; the ladle 10¼ in (26 cm) long. Estimate £80,000-120,000. This lot is offered in Russian Art on 5 June 2017 at Christie’s in London, King Street

An impressive gem-set silver kovsh and ladle. Marked K. Fabergé with the Imperial warrant, Moscow, 1899-1908. The kovsh 13⅝ in (34.6 cm) high; the ladle 10¼ in (26 cm) long. Estimate: £80,000-120,000. This lot is offered in Russian Art on 5 June 2017 at Christie’s in London, King Street

A highly important and impressive silver-gilt and guilloché enamel bowenite mantel clock marked Fabergé with the Imperial warrant. With the workmasters mark of Julius Rappoport, St Petersburg, 1899-1904, scratched inventory number 7532. Estimate £300,000-500,000. This work is offered in the Russian Art sale on 5 June at Christie’s London

A highly important and impressive silver-gilt and guilloché enamel bowenite mantel clock marked Fabergé with the Imperial warrant. With the workmaster's mark of Julius Rappoport, St Petersburg, 1899-1904, scratched inventory number 7532. Estimate: £300,000-500,000. This work is offered in the Russian Art sale on 5 June at Christie’s London

‘I have a special interest in pieces bearing the marks of Andrei Bragin’s workshop. Less known than other jewellers, he produced beautifully chased and enamelled silver pieces, including masterpieces given by the Russian navy to France at the time of the Franco-Russian Alliance; these were the first major Russian works of art I discovered, studied, and published.’

What do you consider to be the greatest work of Russian art, and why?

Anton Belov: ‘Of course it's Malevich’s Black Square. There’s no argument: there was no more important work in the 20th century, no more important artist. No country produced anything of greater importance. It’s an icon of the 20th century, and even today it defines trends in the development of art.’

Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin (1878-1939), Self-portrait. Charcoal on paper. 15 x 11¾ in (38 x 30 cm). With a study for the present portrait on the reverse. Estimate £30,000-50,000. This work is offered in the Russian Art auction on 5 June at Christie’s London

Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin (1878-1939), Self-portrait. Charcoal on paper. 15 x 11¾ in (38 x 30 cm). With a study for the present portrait on the reverse. Estimate: £30,000-50,000. This work is offered in the Russian Art auction on 5 June at Christie’s London

Ann Dumas: ‘There are so many works that could qualify for this accolade so I will just mention one of my great favourites: Malevich’s Red Square. At the Royal Academy, we show it at the pinnacle of our reconstruction of Malevich’s 1932 exhibition. I like it because it is so daring. It was such an extraordinarily bold thing to do in 1915, to distil the essence of a painting to a single square. Ironically, perhaps, Malevich called it Painterly Realism of a Peasant Woman in Two Dimensions.

‘This work and the perhaps even more famous Black Square  were the ultimate distillation of form and colour. For Malevich, these purely abstract works had a spiritual dimension. In some ways, they were a modern reinterpretation of the traditional Russian icon.’

Kasimir Malevich (1878-1935), Orthodoxe I, 1912. Sold for $42,500 on 7 May 2009 at Christie’s in New York

Kasimir Malevich (1878-1935), Orthodoxe I, 1912. Sold for $42,500 on 7 May 2009 at Christie’s in New York

Zelfira Tregulova: ‘Andrei Rublev’s Trinity. Again, there is no need for explanation.’

Wilfried Zeisler: ‘It may sound like a cliché, but I have a sincere interest in Mikhail Vrubel’s works. I can spend hours observing Vrubel’s ‘Demons’ at the Tretyakov Gallery or at the State Russian Museum. His 1894 plaster head of the Demon at the State Russian Museum is one of my favourites.

‘I also love the pottery he created — their glazes and colours are just beautiful. My interest in Vrubel brought me to Kiev, where I went to see his murals in the St. Cyril Church, especially Vrubel’s Madonna. The study of the head for this work, now at the Tretyakov Gallery, has the most fascinating eyes I have ever seen.’

Mikhail Vrubel (1856-1910), Spring. Sold for £205,875 on 3 June 2013 at Christie’s London

Mikhail Vrubel (1856-1910), Spring. Sold for £205,875 on 3 June 2013 at Christie’s London

For a newcomer to Russian art, which museum or gallery would you recommend visiting, and why?

Zelfira Tregulova: ‘The Tretyakov Gallery and the Russian Museum. There’s no need to explain why. These are two collections where everyone can understand what Russian artistic genius is.’

Margarita Pushkina, Founding Director, Cosmoscow: ‘I would definitely recommend the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow — the foremost museum representing Russian art. The “old” gallery in Lavrushinsky Lane is a great place to view works by the brilliant Andrei Rublev. The “new” space on Krymsky Val has an equally impressive collection of avant-garde masterpieces and contemporary art.’

Ann Dumas: ‘For those interested in the Russian avant-garde of the early 20th century, or Constructivist and Suprematist art, a visit to the outstanding George Kostakis Collection at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Thessaloniki, Greece, is well worthwhile.’

Wassily Kandinsky (1866-1944), Oben und links, 1925. Sold for $8,311,500 in the Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale on 15 May 2017 at Christie’s in New York

Wassily Kandinsky (1866-1944), Oben und links, 1925. Sold for $8,311,500 in the Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale on 15 May 2017 at Christie’s in New York

Anton Belov: ‘Russia is so enormous that it’s difficult to recommend a single museum. In Moscow, a visit to the new Tretyakov is a must. You should look at everything, from the Russian avant-garde to works of the 1990s.

‘Beyond Moscow, many Russian cities have excellent collections of avant-garde art and interesting 1960s and 1970s works. You’ll be surprised what masterpieces can be found in local museums in cities such as Samara or Krasnodar, including works by Malevich and Kandinsky. There’s always something interesting to discover.’