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    Sale 2056

    ANTIQUITIES

    9 December 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 158

    A ROMAN MARBLE TORSO OF A GOD

    CIRCA 1ST-2ND CENTURY A.D.

    Price Realised  

    A ROMAN MARBLE TORSO OF A GOD
    CIRCA 1ST-2ND CENTURY A.D.
    Perhaps depicting Dionysus or Apollo, inspired by the work of Praxiteles, the muscular figure originally standing with his left arm lowered, the right raised and projecting forward, with tendrils of hair falling on to each shoulder
    36 in. (91.4 cm.) high


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    The pose of this torso recalls both the Apollo Lykeios and the pouring satyr traditionally associated with Praxiteles. The Apollo Lykeios depicts the god leaning on a column, one hand holding a bow and the other resting on the crown of the head, while the satyr is shown raising a jug above his head in his right hand, pouring wine into a cup held in his lowered left hand. Both types are known from numerous copies, but none have tendrils of hair falling onto the shoulders, as seen on the present example. For the Apollo and the satyr see figs. 15 and 19 in Bieber, The Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age. The same pose was also adopted for depictions of Dionysos, and there is a closely related example of the god, complete with tendrils, in the Museo Nazionale Romano, Rome, fig. 168 in Pasquier and Martinez, Praxitèle. The pose was also employed for Apollo playing a kithara, holding the instrument in his left hand and the plectrum in his right. See figs. 679-681 in Bieber, op. cit.

    Provenance

    Anonymous sale; Sotheby's, London, 14 July 1986, lot 156.
    with André Emmerich, New York, 1989 (Classical Antiquities, 6 December 1988 - 7 January 1989, no. IV).


    Pre-Lot Text

    PROPERTY FROM A NEW YORK COLLECTION