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    Sale 2007

    Antiquities

    4 June 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 14

    AN EGYPTIAN GREEN SCHIST SPOON FOR DJED-HAPY-IWEF-ANKH

    LATE PERIOD TO EARLY PTOLEMAIC PERIOD, CIRCA 6TH-4TH CENTURY B.C.

    Price Realised  

    AN EGYPTIAN GREEN SCHIST SPOON FOR DJED-HAPY-IWEF-ANKH
    LATE PERIOD TO EARLY PTOLEMAIC PERIOD, CIRCA 6TH-4TH CENTURY B.C.
    In the form of a right hand holding a mussel shell, supported by the palm with the fingers extended and the thumb hooked over the rim, the fingernails articulated, a vertical column of hieroglyphs on the bowl reading, "Scribe(??) of a phyle, Djed-Hapy-i(w)ef-ankh, son of Ir-Hap-iawet, born of the Lady of the House Ir-s(y)-Neith-heb"
    4 1/8 in. (10.4 cm.) long


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    For a related example in wood, New Kingdom in date, in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, see no. 250 in Brovarski, et al., Egypt's Golden Age: The Art of Living in the New Kingdom. According to Peck and Freed (p. 211 in Brovarski, et al., op. cit.), "Mussel shells were used as early as predynastic times as containers for eye paint... Hand-held shell spoons begin in the Middle Kingdom in an elongated form, such as an example in Berlin, which provides one of the few instances of an inscription on this type of object. The phrase, 'It is to the beloved of Horus and the beloved of the city god that I have given incense,' implies that this was a ritual spoon. On the other hand, a New Kingdom frit spoon of larger size in the Metropolitan Museum contains traces of red paint of the type used by artists and scribes." The inscription on the Jéquier spoon clearly indicates that it was for use by the scribe Djed-Hapy-i(w)ef-ankh, who was associated with the priesthood.

    Provenance

    Collected by Gustave Jéquier (1868-1946).