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    Sale 12239

    Antiquities

    6 July 2016, London, King Street

  • Lot 112

    AN EGYPTIAN PAINTED LIMESTONE SHABTI FOR THE ROYAL SCRIBE AND OVERSEER OF THE CATTLE OF AMUN DJEHUTYMOSE

    NEW KINGDOM, 19TH DYNASTY, CIRCA 1292-1185 B.C.

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    AN EGYPTIAN PAINTED LIMESTONE SHABTI FOR THE ROYAL SCRIBE AND OVERSEER OF THE CATTLE OF AMUN DJEHUTYMOSE
    NEW KINGDOM, 19TH DYNASTY, CIRCA 1292-1185 B.C.
    Depicted mummiform, wearing a double wig of echeloned and zigzag curls bound in a headband and fronted by a lotus flower, a short false beard, his arms crossing the chest, the fisted hands emerging from within the vestment, holding an ankh-cross and a was-sceptre, the oval face with large eyes, cosmetic lines painted in black and full lips, an ankh cross amulet suspended beneath a broad collar, with a single column of hieroglyphs reading: "Illuminate the Osiris, the Royal Scribe, the Overseer of the cattle of Amun, Djehutymose, Justified", preserving black, red and blue pigment
    9 7/8 in. (25 cm.) high


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    Djehutymose is known from his large granite anthropomorphic sarcophagus, now in the Cairo Museum, that was found together with several shabtis at Tûna el-Gebel in the early 20th century (see Porter and Moss, Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Reliefs, and Paintings, pp. 174-175 ). This shabti presents some rare features, including the headband, the was and ankh-scepters instead of agricultural implements in his hands, and the necklace with an ankh pendant. Other shabtis for Djehutymose are known for their original aspect: a baboon-headed example was sold in our New York rooms in June 2012 (lot 12), another one with a jackal head is in the Toledo Museum. It is thought that they were part of a set representing the Sons of Horus (J. H. Taylor, Death and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt, Chicago, 2001, p. 132-133), in which the present lot could represent the human-headed Imsety.

    Provenance

    Possibly from Tuna el-Gebel.
    with Charles Bouché, Paris.
    Private collection, France, acquired from the above on 15 January 1981.