• Lot 195

    RARE ET IMPORTANTE STATUE DE BUDDHAKAPALA ET CITRASENA EN BRONZE DORE

    TIBET, POSSIBLEMENT DENSATIL, FIN DU XIVEME SIECLE

    Price Realised  

    RARE ET IMPORTANTE STATUE DE BUDDHAKAPALA ET CITRASENA EN BRONZE DORE
    TIBET, POSSIBLEMENT DENSATIL, FIN DU XIVEME SIECLE
    Représentés tous deux enlacés (yab-yum), dansant en ardhaparyankasana sur un corps allongé reposant sur une base lotiforme, les deux mains principales du dieu tenant le kapala et le karttrika, les deux autres tenant un tambour et un bâton de cérémonie (danda), sa parèdre brandissant également le karttrika et le kapala, tous deux portant des guirlandes de têtes, le visage féroce, le front rehaussé du troisième oeil, Citrasena figurée entièrement nue, le dieu paré de bijoux incrustés et d'étoffes flottantes, le front ceint d'une tiare ouvragée agrémentée de petites perles, les cheveux coiffés en un haut chignon rehaussé d'une représentation du Bouddha, non scellé ; le pied droit de la parèdre manquant
    Hauteur: 35,5 cm. (14 in.)


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    Buddhakapala (Tib: Sangs.rgyas.thod.pa) is a terrifying emanation of the dhyani Buddha Akshobhya and sometimes considered a form of Heruka and then related to the Hevajra cyclus. When together with his female partner Citrasena they can form the centre couple of a mandala.
    Stylistically this extremely rare deity seems to be related to sculptures from the Tibetan Densatil monastery, founded in the twelfth century. The complex was destroyed during the Chinese Cultural revolution in the mid-sixties to mid-seventies of last century. Since then many gilt-bronzes have found their way to the West. Many of them date from the late fourteenth century, like the presented one, when the artistic activities had reached their zenith. Most probably Newari craftsmen were involved next to their Tibetan colleagues. A sumptuous use of semi-precious stone inlay is one of the characteristics of icons from this monastery. The Buddhakapala is inlaid with semi-precious stones of which many are still remaining. Extremely rare are the minute pearled strings attached to his crown that survived man and time.

    Buddhakapala is depicted in L. Chandra, Buddhist Iconography, New Delhi 1988, vol. 1. No. 994. A gilt-bronze guardian stemming from the Densatil monastery is published by A. Heller in Tibetan Art, Milan 1999, pl. 82.
    Such representations of Buddhakapala are very rare and no other Tibetan gilt-bronze figure of the divinity appears to have been sold through auction. For a comparable feeling in terms of sensibility, achievement and strength, see a gilt-bronze figure of Vajravarahi from Densatil, dated 14th century and sold in our New York Rooms, 20 September 2006, lot 130.

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT payable at 19.6% (5.5% for books) will be added to the buyer’s premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis


    Provenance

    Acquired by the present owner from Paul Telco, London 1972.


    Pre-Lot Text

    COLLECTION PARTICULIERE PARISIENNE


    Literature

    M.-Th. de Mallmann, Introduction à l'iconographie du Tantrisme Bouddhique, Paris 1975, pl.XIX 2.


    Post Lot Text

    A RARE AND IMPORTANT GILT-BRONZE FIGURE OF BUDDHAKAPALA AND CITRASENA
    TIBET, POSSIBLY DENSATIL, LATE 14TH CENTURY