• Lot 216

    RARE HABIT DE CEREMONIE ET SON CASQUE

    CHINE, DYNASTIE QING, XIXEME SIECLE

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    RARE HABIT DE CEREMONIE ET SON CASQUE
    CHINE, DYNASTIE QING, XIXEME SIECLE
    Comprenant plusieurs éléments indépendants: une veste et un tablier brodés de motifs bleus en Y sur fond de fils d'or rehaussés de clous métalliques en forme de Y et bordés de velours marron, un médaillon brodé d'un dragon sur la poitrine, un autre dans le dos, deux sur le tablier, un autre sur chaque épaulette, celles-ci bordées de plaques métalliques dorées ornées de dragons en repoussé ; le casque en métal orné d'ornements en filigrane représentant des dragons, surmonté d'un pompon fait de fils rouges
    Hauteur: 155 cm. (61 in.), Hauteur du casque: 27 cm. (10 5/8 in.)


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    Each regiment of the Manchu Banner army was wearing uniforms in the colors of their banner. They were made in the Imperial workshops in Hangzhou and when not worn were stored at the Western Gate of the Forbidden City.
    Ceremonial suits of armor of the present type were worn by high-ranking officers during ceremonies when the Emperor reviewed his armies to assess their strength and techniques of cavalry, archery and combat. Although the purpose of this uniform was purely ceremonial, its construction is based on armour used for protection in battle. Made of satin padded with cotton, trimmed and lined with blue silk, they were covered with gilt studs and embroidered with dragon roundels. The sleeves are separate from the tunic body and attached by means of silk straps and buckless, thus allowing the wearer a greater range of arm movement. The exposed areas around the sleeves were then covered with shoulder guards. The legs were covered with aprons, again for protection, but the seat was left free to allow the wearer to mount a horse. The front square panel here is made of silk, but would have been made of metal in an actual combat armour.
    Compare with two almost identical ceremonial suits of armor, one kept in the Museuo Oriental de Valladoid, the other in John E. Vollmer, Decoding Dragons: Status garments in Ch'ing Dynasty China, University of Oregon Museum of Art, 1983, frontispiece; another similar suit of armor was sold at Sotheby's New York, 23 March 2004, lot 554 and a further one at Sotheby's London, 13 November 2002, lot 17.

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT payable at 19.6% (5.5% for books) will be added to the buyer’s premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis


    Provenance

    From a French collection


    Post Lot Text

    A RARE SUIT OF CEREMONIAL ARMOR WITH HELMET
    CHINA, QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY