• Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 12256

    Antiquities

    12 April 2016, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 130

    THREE ROMAN STONE RINGSTONES

    CIRCA 1ST CENTURY B.C.-1ST CENTURY A.D.

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    THREE ROMAN STONE RINGSTONES
    CIRCA 1ST CENTURY B.C.-1ST CENTURY A.D.
    Including two of carnelian, one with a faun kneeling with one arm extended towards a statue on a column before him, the statue also kneeling, with foliate sprigs in the field, on a groundline; and one with the bust of a satyr in profile to the left, with a long pointed ear and curly hair, an animal skin over his shoulders; and one of agate with the mask of a satyr in profile to the left, with letters in the field, T ADI, perhaps the owners initials
    Largest: 9/16 in. (1.4 cm.) long


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    Provenance

    G. Sangiorgi Collection (1886-1965), Rome.
    Private Collection, Monaco, 1970s; thence by descent.


    Pre-Lot Text

    THE PROPERTY OF A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTOR

    Giorgio Sangiorgi (1886-1965) was a principle of the most renowned art-dealing family in Rome. The firm was located at 117 via Ripetta at Palazzo Borghese and was famous for many important auctions, with catalogues written in collaboration with leading scholars. The galleria specialized in ancient art, furniture, ceramics and textiles. As a private collector, Sangiorgi assembled an important ancient glass collection, which he published in 1914. Masterpieces from it were sold in the 1960s and are now the pride of numerous institutions such as the Toledo Museum of Art and the Corning Museum of Glass; the bulk of the collection was sold here at Christie’s New York in June 1999, “Ancient Glass formerly in the G. Sangiorgi Collection.” As with the glass collection, many of the objects in his personal collection, such as the gems presented here, were acquired throughout Europe and never imported into Italy.