• Arts of the Samurai  auction at Christies

    Sale 2378

    Arts of the Samurai

    23 October 2009, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 47

    A MINO WAKIZASHI

    MOMOYAMA PERIOD (LATE 16TH-EARLY 17TH CENTURY), SIGNED DAIDO SAKU

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A MINO WAKIZASHI
    MOMOYAMA PERIOD (LATE 16TH-EARLY 17TH CENTURY), signed Daido saku
    Sugata [configuration]: Hira-zukuri, iori-mune, even curve, roundly curved kissaki
    Kitae [forging pattern]: Itame
    Hamon [tempering pattern]: gunome-ba of nioi with nie
    Boshi [tip]: Ko-maru with long kaeri
    Nakago [tang]: Ubu, higaki file marks, two mekugi-ana, shallow kurijiri
    Habaki [collar]: Double gold clad copper
    Nagasa [length of blade]: 31cm
    Horimono [carving]: Bohi kakinagasu both sides of blade
    Koshirae [mounting]: In its wakizashi mounting with ribbed lacquered scabbard, metal fittings, hilt and upper part of scabbard with Nanban motifs of a European sailing ship, groups of Westerners and a group with a rider on an elephant

    The blade accompanied by a certificate of registration as a Tokubetsu kicho token (Especially important sword) no. 213468 issued by the Nihon Bijutsu Token Hozon Kyokai (Society for the Preservation of the Japanese Art Sword), dated 1971.5.16 (2)


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    The smith Kanemichi of Seki in Mino province migrated to Kyoto sometime around the 1570s and 1580s. He was given the name "Daido" ("Great Way"), with a play on the second character of his name alternately read "michi," or "way." Daido was the father of four sons of whom Iga no kami Kinmichi and his successors became influential in the granting of honorific titles to swordsmiths throughout the Edo period.

    The squarish gunome of the hamon of this blade is very much in Mino style, and the rather pointed boshi with the long straight return is close to the later boshi of the schools of Daido's sons. The first generation was followed by later smiths who worked much in the same style.