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    Sale 1922

    Fine Printed Books and Manuscripts Including Americana

    3 December 2007, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 61

    BRADBURY, John (fl. 1809). Travels in the Interior of America, in the Years 1809, 1810, and 1811; including a Description of Upper Louisiana, together with the States of Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, and Tennessee, with the Illinois and Western Territories. Liverpool: printed for the author by Smith and Galway and published by Sherwood, Neely and Jones, London, 1817.

    Price Realised  

    BRADBURY, John (fl. 1809). Travels in the Interior of America, in the Years 1809, 1810, and 1811; including a Description of Upper Louisiana, together with the States of Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, and Tennessee, with the Illinois and Western Territories. Liverpool: printed for the author by Smith and Galway and published by Sherwood, Neely and Jones, London, 1817.

    8o (225 x 140 mm). Errata slip tipped-in. (½-in. chip to blank upper margin of title, some light browning.) Original boards, uncut (endpapers renewed, rebacked preserving original spine, a few small stains to boards).

    FIRST EDITION. The Scottish naturalist Bradbury traveled up the Missouri River to the Arikara and Mandan villages, then returned down river to St. Louis. The appendix includes an account of the Stuart overland trip, an Osage vocabulary, information about the Mississippi Valley, and an account of the captivity of John Colter. There is also a "Catalogue of some of the more rare or valuable plants discovered in the neighborhood of St. Louis and on the Missouri." Bradbury's account "deserves to be classed as one of the most accurate and pleasingly written travel accounts of this period of American history" (Clark). Bradbury was accompanied on this trip by naturalist Thomas Nuttall. This account is also notable for providing one of the only firsthand accounts of the New Madrid earthquake, which he witness on the banks of the Mississippi only a few miles from the epicenter. He was almost alone in speculating that the lands bordering the Missouri River would become a great agricultural resource, just before the public began to think of the Great Plains as the "Great American Desert." Ayer Supplement 23; Clark Old South II:137(1); Graff 383; Howes B-695; Pilling Proof-Sheets 433; Sabin 7207; Streeter sale III:1779; Wagner-Camp-Becker 14:1.


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