eCruikshank," with flourish) and ("Charles Dickens," with flourish), to an unknown young lady who had requested an autograph, 4 October 1839. 1 page, 4o (220 x 173mm). Cloth protective case. Provenance: Kenyon Starling. " /> DICKENS, Charles and George CRUIKSHANK. An unusual joint autograph letter signed ("Geo<V>eCruikshank," with flourish) and ("Charles Dickens," with flourish), to an unknown young lady who had requested an autograph, 4 October 1839. <I>1 page, 4<V>o (220 x 173mm)</I>. Cloth protective case. <I>Provenance</I>: Kenyon Starling. | Christie's
  • Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 1981

    The William E. Self Family Collection Part I The Kenyon Starling Library Of Charles Dickens

    2 April 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 67

    DICKENS, Charles and George CRUIKSHANK. An unusual joint autograph letter signed ("GeoeCruikshank," with flourish) and ("Charles Dickens," with flourish), to an unknown young lady who had requested an autograph, 4 October 1839. 1 page, 4o (220 x 173mm). Cloth protective case. Provenance: Kenyon Starling.

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    DICKENS, Charles and George CRUIKSHANK. An unusual joint autograph letter signed ("GeoeCruikshank," with flourish) and ("Charles Dickens," with flourish), to an unknown young lady who had requested an autograph, 4 October 1839. 1 page, 4o (220 x 173mm). Cloth protective case. Provenance: Kenyon Starling.

    AUTOGRAPHS FOR "THE YOUNG LADY UNKNOWN". At the top of the sheet, the illustrator has boldly penned a request: "My Dear Dickens, I know you will oblige me with your Autograph for a young lady Your truly Geoe Cruikshank." His exuberant, very florid signature measures fully 116 mm. Evidently Cruikshank expected his friend to add a note and signature, as he carefully left most of the lower half of the sheet empty. Dicken's fills it, writing: "My dear George: With great pleasure - partly for your sake and partly for the sake of the young lady unknown. Faithfully Yours Charles Dickens. 48 Doughty Street October 4th 1839."

    Following the unprecedented success of Pickwick Papers Dickens and his growing family moved in April 1837 from uncomfortable quarters at Furnivall's Inn to an elegant, brick-front townhouse at 48 Doughty Street in Bloomsbury. They resided there only briefly, moving again in December 1839, but during that brief period Dickens was remarkably active, completing Oliver Twist and Nicholas Nickleby and starting work on Barnaby Rudge. The author's former residence is now the Charles Dickens Museum, an important repository of Dickens letters, manuscripts and artifacts.


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