Alice's Adventures Under Ground. Being a facsimile of the original ms. book afterwards developed into "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland". London: Macmillan, 1886." /> DODGSON, Charles Lutwidge ("Lewis Carroll"). <I>Alice's Adventures Under Ground. Being a facsimile of the original ms. book afterwards developed into "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland".</I> London: Macmillan, 1886.|
  • The William E. Self Library, I auction at Christies

    Sale 2153

    The William E. Self Library, Important English and American Literature

    4 December 2009, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 123

    DODGSON, Charles Lutwidge ("Lewis Carroll"). Alice's Adventures Under Ground. Being a facsimile of the original ms. book afterwards developed into "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland". London: Macmillan, 1886.

    Price Realised  

    DODGSON, Charles Lutwidge ("Lewis Carroll"). Alice's Adventures Under Ground. Being a facsimile of the original ms. book afterwards developed into "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland". London: Macmillan, 1886.

    8o. 37 illustrations by the author, including 14 full-page. Original gilt-stamped red cloth, spine gilt-lettered, edges gilt (some minor staining to upper cover). Provenance: Mrs Standen (presentation inscription from the author).

    FIRST EDITION, PRESENTATION COPY, inscribed by Dodgson on the half-title: "Mrs Standen from the Author Jan. 1887." Dodgson notes in his diaries: "Jan. 7. To Town. Spent forenoon at Macmillan's inscribing copies of Alice Under Ground. That day he inscribed 44 known copies. The recipient is presumably one of Dodgson's child-friend and could be Maud or Isabel Standen. Dodgson received his bound copy of Alice's Aventures Under Ground on December 17, 1886 and was "much pleased." However his concerns over its binding reappear in a later letter to Macmillan from January 23, 1887: "A letter, which I received from Messrs. Burn & Co., on the 20th, about Alice Under Ground, contains a sentence I do not like at all. It is this: 'it (the book) was bound in a very great hurry.'... I have laid it down, as a fixed principle, that I will give the public (profit or no profit) the best article I can: I consider that any 'very great hurry' involves very serious risk of the article not being the best I can give: and I shall be really much obliged if you will take measures to prevent any such hurry on future occasions. Believe me..." (Lewis Carroll and the House of Macmillan, p. 220). Williams-Madan-Green-Crutch 194.


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