Trattati diuersi di Sendebar indiano filosopho morale, to Cosimo de' Medici. Although these fables were extremely popular in 16th-century continental Europe and had a lasting influence on literature, this is their first appearance in Italy. They are translated by Doni under the aegis of the Accademia dei Pellegrini, and are splendidly illustrated by Marcolini's woodcuts which teach wisdom and courtesy to princes and rulers. Doni's translation was later used by Sir Thomas North for the first English edition (1570). Adams B-1997; Brunet II, 813; Mortimer Harvard Italian 65; Gamba 1370. " /> DONI, Antonio Francesco (1513?-74). <I>La moral' filisophia del Doni tratta da gli antichi scrittori</I>. Venice: Francesco Marcolini, 1552. 2 parts in one volume, 4° (204 x 145mm). Woodcut device on first title, Medici arms on the second title, 2 portraits and 36 woodcut illustrations, numerous woodcut initials and decorative borders, two different printer's devices in elaborate strapwork frames toward end. (Leaves Q4 and R1 supplied from another copy.) Contemporary English calf with gilt arms of Edward Seymour on sides (expertly rebacked, some restoration at corner and edges.) <I>Provenance</I>: Edward Seymour (1537-1621; armorial binding). FIRST ITALIAN EDITION of the Hindu poem <I>Panchatantra</I> by Bidpai in Doni's rendering handed down from the Arab version by Kalilah wa-Dimnah. The present copy was originally owned by Edward Seymour (1537-1621), Earl of Hertford, the nephew of Jane Seymour, third wife of Henry VIII, and husband of Lady Catherine Gray, sister of Jane Gray, the so called "Nine Days Queen". The first part of the work is dedicated to Don Ferrante Caracciolo and the second part, titled <I>Trattati diuersi di Sendebar indiano filosopho morale</I>, to Cosimo de' Medici. Although these fables were extremely popular in 16th-century continental Europe and had a lasting influence on literature, this is their first appearance in Italy. They are translated by Doni under the aegis of the <I>Accademia dei Pellegrini</I>, and are splendidly illustrated by Marcolini's woodcuts which teach wisdom and courtesy to princes and rulers. Doni's translation was later used by Sir Thomas North for the first English edition (1570). Adams B-1997; Brunet II, 813; Mortimer <I>Harvard Italian</I> 65; Gamba 1370. | Christie's