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    Sale 12259

    Ex Libris Jean R. Perrette: Important Travel, Exploration & Cartography

    5 April 2016, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 341

    DOWNING, Sir George (1623?-1684). A Discourse written by Sr George Downing, the King of Great Britain's envoyée extraordinary to the states of the united Provinces. Vindicating his royal master from the insolencies of a Scandalous libel, printed under the title of kan extract out of The register of the resolutions of the states general of the United provinces, upon the memorial of sir George Downing, Envoyée, &c.l and delivered by the agent de heyde for such, to Several publick ministers: whereas no such resolution was ever Communicated to the said envoyée, nor any answer at all Returned by their lordships to the said memorial. London: Printed by J[ohn]. M[acock], 1664

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    DOWNING, Sir George (1623?-1684). A Discourse written by Sr George Downing, the King of Great Britain's envoyée extraordinary to the states of the united Provinces. Vindicating his royal master from the insolencies of a Scandalous libel, printed under the title of kan extract out of The register of the resolutions of the states general of the United provinces, upon the memorial of sir George Downing, Envoyée, &c.l and delivered by the agent de heyde for such, to Several publick ministers: whereas no such resolution was ever Communicated to the said envoyée, nor any answer at all Returned by their lordships to the said memorial. London: Printed by J[ohn]. M[acock], 1664

    4° (200 x 150 mm). (Lacks final blank, some pale staining and soiling.) 19th-century crimson half russia.

    FIRST EDITION. “The author of this tract was a nephew of Governor Winthrop and the second graduate of Harvard College. He returned to England soon after he was graduated. In 1657 he was appointed by Cromwell ambassador to The Hague. Colbert, the famous French minister, characterized him as 'le plus grand querelleur des diplomats de son temps.' To him is attributed the celebrated Navigation Act to which England owed so much of her naval power, and no one was more instrumental than he in bringing New Netherland under the English dominion. He was charged by the Dutch with instigating the war with England, as a result of which New Amsterdam was retained by the latter” (Church). The part relating to New Amsterdam is on pages 15-17. Alden & Landis 664/62; Church 585; Cox II, p. 69; Wing D2106.


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