1 page, 4to, closely written in ink, integral address leaf in Ellery's hand, to "Miss Philadelphia Ellery" in Providence, R.I. Closing and signature excised but skillfully reaffixed without loss. | Christie's" /> [ELLERY, William. Autograph letter signed to "Dear Philo," Worcester, 23 March 1815. <I>1 page, 4to, closely written in ink, integral address leaf in Ellery's hand, to "Miss Philadelphia Ellery" in Providence, R.I. Closing and signature excised but skillfully reaffixed without loss.</I> | Christie's
  • Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 2011

    Fine Printed Books and Manuscripts Including Americana

    12 June 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 37

    [ELLERY, William. Autograph letter signed to "Dear Philo," Worcester, 23 March 1815. 1 page, 4to, closely written in ink, integral address leaf in Ellery's hand, to "Miss Philadelphia Ellery" in Providence, R.I. Closing and signature excised but skillfully reaffixed without loss.

    Price Realised  

    [ELLERY, William. Autograph letter signed to "Dear Philo," Worcester, 23 March 1815. 1 page, 4to, closely written in ink, integral address leaf in Ellery's hand, to "Miss Philadelphia Ellery" in Providence, R.I. Closing and signature excised but skillfully reaffixed without loss.

    THE END OF THE WAR OF 1812. Newport and the coast of Rhode Island were very vulnerable to naval attack, and during the War, many families temporarily relocated inland for safety. News of the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, in December 1814 did not reach Newport until mid-February 1815. A warm personal letter to a young relation, in the wake of the end of the war. Ellery expresses pleasure "that Belinda is willing...to live with us when peace shall take place," and complains that the bad weather makes it hard to fix a date for his arrival at Providence, but he outlines plans for their rendezvous at Newport. "Your brother W., and wife and daughet attended by Edward Channing arrived at Newport last Saturday...Be yourself at Providence as soon as you conveniently can..." After news of family members, who are coming to Newport, Ellery notes that "Mr. Timmy has gone again to Hartford, and does not mean to live at Newport, the air there not suiting his health so well as that of the country...."

    Ellery, replaced Samuel Ward as Rhode Island delegate to the Continental Congress in 1776. During the War, his home and lands were plundered. He was named by Washington to the lucrative post of Collector of Customs for the port of Newport, and although he was a staunch Federalist, was allowed by the Jeffersonian Democrats to retain it until his death.


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    Pre-Lot Text

    THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN