The British Journal of Experimental Pathology, volume 10, pp.226-236. London: H.K. Lewis Co. Ltd, 1929." /> FLEMING, Alexander (1881-1955). "On the Antibacterial Action of Cultures of a Penicillium, with special reference to their use in the isolation of B. Influenzae." In: <I>The British Journal of Experimental Pathology</I>, volume 10, pp.226-236. London: H.K. Lewis Co. Ltd, 1929. | Christie's
  • Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 2013

    Important Scientific Books: The Richard Green Library

    17 June 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 117

    FLEMING, Alexander (1881-1955). "On the Antibacterial Action of Cultures of a Penicillium, with special reference to their use in the isolation of B. Influenzae." In: The British Journal of Experimental Pathology, volume 10, pp.226-236. London: H.K. Lewis Co. Ltd, 1929.

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    FLEMING, Alexander (1881-1955). "On the Antibacterial Action of Cultures of a Penicillium, with special reference to their use in the isolation of B. Influenzae." In: The British Journal of Experimental Pathology, volume 10, pp.226-236. London: H.K. Lewis Co. Ltd, 1929.

    8o. 2 photographic plates. Contemporary library buckram, gilt-stamped on spine (textblock cracked, some very minor rubbing). Provenance: Lister Institute of Preventative Medicine, Elstree, Hertfordshire (library stamp on pastedowns, half-title, and a few leaves).

    FIRST EDITION OF THE FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE DISCOVERY OF PENICILLIN. In 1929, while working at St. Mary's Hospital in London, Fleming discovered the antibacterial properties of Penicillium mould. He published his findings in this present essay and suggested that the brown liquid substance produced by the mould would be an "efficient antiseptic for application to, or injection into, areas infected with penicillin-sensitive microbes" (p. 236). However, the substance proved to be unstable and chemically complex, and attempts to create a pure and stable drug by Fleming proved unsuccessful. In 1940, Ernst Chain and Howard Florey (see lot 50) were able to stabilize the drug and work out suitable dosages for treatment. In 1945, Fleming, Chain, and Florey shared the Nobel Prized for Medicine. Garrison-Morton 1933; Grolier Medicine 96; Heirs of Hippocrates 2320; Norman 798; PMM 420a.


    Contact Client Service
    • info@christies.com

    • New York +1 212 636 2000

    • London +44 (0)20 7839 9060

    • Hong Kong +852 2760 1766

    • Shanghai +86 21 6355 1766