1 page, folio (6½ x 7 1/8 in.), a few closed tears, otherwise good." /> [FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR]. MILLER, Peter. Partly printed document signed ("Peeter Miller" and with his mark), Massachusetts Bay, 26 June 1761. Attested by Joseph Hawley. <I>1 page, folio (6½ x 7 1/8 in.), a few closed tears, otherwise good</I>. | Christie's
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    Sale 1922

    Fine Printed Books and Manuscripts Including Americana

    3 December 2007, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 127

    [FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR]. MILLER, Peter. Partly printed document signed ("Peeter Miller" and with his mark), Massachusetts Bay, 26 June 1761. Attested by Joseph Hawley. 1 page, folio (6½ x 7 1/8 in.), a few closed tears, otherwise good.

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    [FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR]. MILLER, Peter. Partly printed document signed ("Peeter Miller" and with his mark), Massachusetts Bay, 26 June 1761. Attested by Joseph Hawley. 1 page, folio (6½ x 7 1/8 in.), a few closed tears, otherwise good.

    A SUBSTITUTE'S BOUNTY FROM THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR. A rare, interesting glimpse into the lives of the men who fought in the French and Indian War, as a Massachusetts man acknowledges receipt of his substitute's bounty for serving in a Massachusetts regiment in place of another. The 46-year old Peter Miller, who signs with his mark (a cross), as well as a somewhat uncertain script signature, receives nine pounds from William Williams, "to serve His Majesty as a Soldier in one of the Regiments raised in this Province, to provide for the full and entire Security of His Majesty's Dominions in North-America, and particularly His Majesty's Conquests there, during the Absence of such Part of the Regular Forces, as shall be employed in an Enterprise against the Enemy..." Miller was to serve until July 1762 "unless by the intervention of Peace, by the Return of the said Regulars..." It appears that Miller was signing up to fill up a garrison regiment (probably in one of the recent "conquests" of Louisbourg, Cape Breton, Quebec or Montreal), while the regulars went out on their unspecified "expedition," most likely for the assaults against the West Indies and Martinique recently ordered by Prime Minister Pitt. Historian Fred Anderson says of Amherst: "As much as he had come to despise American provincials--whom he thought barely worth their rations, much less their princely pay--Amherst had no choice but to request more than ten thousand troops from New England, New York and New Jersey to help garrison his far-flung forts" (Anderson Crucible of War, 473).


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