PMM). The Treatise not only represents the greatest achievement of English philosophy in the 18th-century but, in its clarity, is among the finest examples of 18th-century prose style. Brunet III, 376; Jessop p.13; Lowndes III, 1140; PMM 194; Rothschild 1171. (3) " /> HUME, David (1711-1776). <I>A Treatise of Human Nature: being an Attempt to introduce the Experimental Method of Reasoning into Moral Subjects</I>. Vol.I: <I>Of the Understanding.</I> [Vol.II: <I>Of the Passions</I>. Vol.III: <I>Of Morals</I>]. London: Printed for John Noon [vol.III Printed for Thomas Longman], 1739-40. 3 volumes, 8° (193 x 122mm). Headpieces, initials and ornaments, one-page of publisher's advertisements at the end of vol.I (some very light spotting and staining to titles, and mainly to margins of first few leaves of vols.II and III, very small hole touching rule in title of vol.II., a few other light spots). Contemporary speckled calf gilt, covers with double gilt fillet, neatly rebacked in old style preserving original red and green lettering-pieces (extremities lightly rubbed), modern yellow cloth box. <I>Provenance</I>: Sandeman Public Library, Perth (armorial bookplate); accession numbers and others in manuscript at foot of titles and following leaf of each vol.; "The Original edition" and date underlined in a vivid but neat pink ink at foot of title in vol.I, repeated in vol.III in black ink underlined in pink; some early annotation to blanks. FIRST EDITION of this work of Hume's youth which represents 'the first attempt to apply Locke's empirical psychology to build a theory of knowledge, and from it to provide a critique of metaphysical ideas' and which 'sums up a century of speculation on knowledge and of theological discussion' (both <I>PMM</I>). The <I>Treatise</I> not only represents the greatest achievement of English philosophy in the 18th-century but, in its clarity, is among the finest examples of 18th-century prose style. Brunet III, 376; Jessop p.13; Lowndes III, 1140; <I>PMM</I> 194; Rothschild 1171. (3) |
  • Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 5309

    Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts

    2 June 2008, London, South Kensington

  • Lot 246

    HUME, David (1711-1776). A Treatise of Human Nature: being an Attempt to introduce the Experimental Method of Reasoning into Moral Subjects. Vol.I: Of the Understanding. [Vol.II: Of the Passions. Vol.III: Of Morals]. London: Printed for John Noon [vol.III Printed for Thomas Longman], 1739-40. 3 volumes, 8° (193 x 122mm). Headpieces, initials and ornaments, one-page of publisher's advertisements at the end of vol.I (some very light spotting and staining to titles, and mainly to margins of first few leaves of vols.II and III, very small hole touching rule in title of vol.II., a few other light spots). Contemporary speckled calf gilt, covers with double gilt fillet, neatly rebacked in old style preserving original red and green lettering-pieces (extremities lightly rubbed), modern yellow cloth box. Provenance: Sandeman Public Library, Perth (armorial bookplate); accession numbers and others in manuscript at foot of titles and following leaf of each vol.; "The Original edition" and date underlined in a vivid but neat pink ink at foot of title in vol.I, repeated in vol.III in black ink underlined in pink; some early annotation to blanks.

    FIRST EDITION of this work of Hume's youth which represents 'the first attempt to apply Locke's empirical psychology to build a theory of knowledge, and from it to provide a critique of metaphysical ideas' and which 'sums up a century of speculation on knowledge and of theological discussion' (both PMM). The Treatise not only represents the greatest achievement of English philosophy in the 18th-century but, in its clarity, is among the finest examples of 18th-century prose style. Brunet III, 376; Jessop p.13; Lowndes III, 1140; PMM 194; Rothschild 1171. (3)

    Price Realised  

    HUME, David (1711-1776). A Treatise of Human Nature: being an Attempt to introduce the Experimental Method of Reasoning into Moral Subjects. Vol.I: Of the Understanding. [Vol.II: Of the Passions. Vol.III: Of Morals]. London: Printed for John Noon [vol.III Printed for Thomas Longman], 1739-40. 3 volumes, 8° (193 x 122mm). Headpieces, initials and ornaments, one-page of publisher's advertisements at the end of vol.I (some very light spotting and staining to titles, and mainly to margins of first few leaves of vols.II and III, very small hole touching rule in title of vol.II., a few other light spots). Contemporary speckled calf gilt, covers with double gilt fillet, neatly rebacked in old style preserving original red and green lettering-pieces (extremities lightly rubbed), modern yellow cloth box. Provenance: Sandeman Public Library, Perth (armorial bookplate); accession numbers and others in manuscript at foot of titles and following leaf of each vol.; "The Original edition" and date underlined in a vivid but neat pink ink at foot of title in vol.I, repeated in vol.III in black ink underlined in pink; some early annotation to blanks.

    FIRST EDITION of this work of Hume's youth which represents 'the first attempt to apply Locke's empirical psychology to build a theory of knowledge, and from it to provide a critique of metaphysical ideas' and which 'sums up a century of speculation on knowledge and of theological discussion' (both PMM). The Treatise not only represents the greatest achievement of English philosophy in the 18th-century but, in its clarity, is among the finest examples of 18th-century prose style. Brunet III, 376; Jessop p.13; Lowndes III, 1140; PMM 194; Rothschild 1171. (3)


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