The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science. Volume 23 (1843), pp. 263-276 (October), 347-355 (November), 435-455 (December). London: Richard & John E. Taylor, 1843." /> JOULE, James Prescott (1818-1889). "On the Calorific Effects of Magneto-Electricity, and on the Mechanical Value of Heat." In: <I>The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science</I>. Volume 23 (1843), pp. 263-276 (October), 347-355 (November), 435-455 (December). London: Richard & John E. Taylor, 1843.|
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    Sale 2013

    Important Scientific Books: The Richard Green Library

    17 June 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 200

    JOULE, James Prescott (1818-1889). "On the Calorific Effects of Magneto-Electricity, and on the Mechanical Value of Heat." In: The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science. Volume 23 (1843), pp. 263-276 (October), 347-355 (November), 435-455 (December). London: Richard & John E. Taylor, 1843.

    Price Realised  

    JOULE, James Prescott (1818-1889). "On the Calorific Effects of Magneto-Electricity, and on the Mechanical Value of Heat." In: The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science. Volume 23 (1843), pp. 263-276 (October), 347-355 (November), 435-455 (December). London: Richard & John E. Taylor, 1843.

    8o (215 x 133 mm). Engraved frontispiece, numerous text illustrations. Contemporary half calf, gilt, marbled boards.

    "EXPERIMENTAL PROOF OF THE MECHANICAL EQUIVALENT OF HEAT FOR PHYSICAL PHENOMENA" (PMM, p. 196)

    FIRST EDITION, journal issue. "Joule's work... was fundamental to the establishment of the principle of the conservation of energy" (Norman). In this paper, Joule noted the relationship between the amount of heat generated by an electric current in a conductor and the resistance of the conductor, and the creation of heat when water was forced through narrow tubes or through a paddle wheel. He concluded that heat was a form of energy, and was able to calculate that in any given system the sum total of energy was constant and convertible. Dibner Heralds of Science 158; Norman 1179.


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