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    Sale 12259

    Ex Libris Jean R. Perrette: Important Travel, Exploration & Cartography

    5 April 2016, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 280

    MAHE, Bertrand-François, comte de La Bourdonnais (1699-1753). Memoire pour Le Sieur De La Bourdonnais, avec les pieces justificatives. Paris: l'Imprimerie de Delaguette, 1750-51.

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    MAHE, Bertrand-François, comte de La Bourdonnais (1699-1753). Memoire pour Le Sieur De La Bourdonnais, avec les pieces justificatives. Paris: l'Imprimerie de Delaguette, 1750-51.

    4° (244 x 192 mm). 2 engraved folding maps (one hand-colored); 4 folding letterpress tables. Contemporary French mottled calf gilt, spine gilt in compartments, gilt-lettered red morocco lettering piece. Provenance: contemporary library shelf mark on verso of front free endpaper; extensive contemporary manuscript note at foot of last printed leaf: “Judgement des commissaires du 3r. fevrier 1751 Nous commissaires generaux susdits en vertu du pouvoir a nous donné par sa majesté en ce qui concerne le dit matré [sic] de la bourdonnaise ...”

    FIRST EDITION. “La Bourdonnais entered the service of the French East India Company as a lieutenant at 19, was promoted to captain in 1724, and took part in the capture of Mahé on the Malabar Coast (southwestern India) in 1726. From 1735 to 1740, he was governor of Île de France (Mauritius) and Île de Bourbon (Réunion) in the Indian Ocean, but with the outbreak of war between France and Great Britain, he was put in command of a fleet in Indian waters.

    “La Bourdonnais distinguished himself in the defense of the French outpost of Mahé and the relief of the governor-general of French East India, Joseph-François Dupleix, at Pondicherry; he defeated British forces in two naval actions. His blockade of Madras by sea enabled the French to capture this important port in September 1746. Bad relations with Dupleix, however, exacerbated by Dupleix's removal of him as governor of Île [sic] de France, obliged him to return to France. Although his ship was captured by the British, he was allowed to return home on parole. Arrested in 1748 on charges of corruption, he was imprisoned in the Bastille for more than two years. He was tried in 1751 and acquitted” ( Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 17 Apr. 2009).

    According to Barbier, the work was actually written by Pierre de Gennes (1701-1759), and was reissued in 1751 with a supplement. Barbier III, 144; Quérard V, p. 432.


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