The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. 1837." /> [PICKWICK PAPERS]. -- BROWNE, Hablot K. ["Phiz"] (1815-1882). "Discovery of Jingle in the Fleet." Original pencil and wash drawing for <I>The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club</I>. 1837.|
  • Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 1981

    The William E. Self Family Collection Part I The Kenyon Starling Library Of Charles Dickens

    2 April 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 26

    [PICKWICK PAPERS]. -- BROWNE, Hablot K. ["Phiz"] (1815-1882). "Discovery of Jingle in the Fleet." Original pencil and wash drawing for The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. 1837.

    Price Realised  

    [PICKWICK PAPERS]. -- BROWNE, Hablot K. ["Phiz"] (1815-1882). "Discovery of Jingle in the Fleet." Original pencil and wash drawing for The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. 1837.

    167 x 129 mm. (6 5/8 x 5 1/16 in), sight size; 120 x 115 mm. (4¾ x 4½ in), image size; mounted on card and matted; housed in morocco folder and morocco backed folding case. Provenance: Comte Alain de Suzannet (his sale, Sotheby's London, 22 November 1971, lot 184, illustrated); Kenyon Starling (bookplate).

    The plate appears opposite page 452 in the First Edition, illustrating the wonderful scene when Pickwick, himself imprisoned at the Fleet Prison, comes across Jingle and his servant, Job Trotter, among the inmates at the poor side of the Fleet--his scheming finally caught up with him.

    "...Mr. Pickwick was affected; the two men looked so very miserable. The sharp involuntary glance Jingle had cast at a small piece of raw loin of mutton, which Job had brought in with him, said more of their reduced state than two hours' explanation could have done..." (p. 453).
    The rascal Alfred Jingle, strolling actor and adventurer of "No Hall, Nowhere," enters the novel much earlier when he rescues Pickwick from an altercation with a cab driver in the second chapter. He entertains the Pickwickians on the journey to Rochester, but his scheming trickery eventually leads them into some difficult (yet hilarious) situations throughout the story. Pickwick takes pity on him upon seeing him at the Fleet, and settles their debts, as well as pays their way to the West Indies to start a new life. ORIGINAL DRAWINGS FOR 'PICKWICK' PAPERS ARE EXCEPTIONALLY RARE: according to American Prices Current no original Browne drawing for Pickwick has appeared at auction in at least thirty years.


    Contact Client Service
    • info@christies.com

    • New York +1 212 636 2000

    • London +44 (0)20 7839 9060

    • Hong Kong +852 2760 1766

    • Shanghai +86 21 6355 1766