The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science. Volume 5, Sixth Series. Pp. 177-187. London: Taylor and Francis, January-June 1903. 8o (208 x 136 mm). Illustrated. (Preliminaries repaired in the gutter.) Later green cloth. FIRST EDITION. A pioneer in the study of radiation, it was during 1902-1903 that Rutherford and his colleague Frederick Soddy at Mcgill University in Toronto theorized that radiation depleted over time: "Rutherford and Soddy saw that [sources of radiation] actually had half-lives, though they were very long compared with human lifetimes, meaning that they contained relatively enormous numbers of atoms. If they were the Adam or Eve of a family their numbers and activities were actually declining, even if the changes could not then be measured. This insight allowed Rutherford and Soddy to overcome an obstacle to any theory of radioactivity: it must conform to the law of conservation of energy. This meant that the energy's source must be identified, be it sunlight, moving air molecules, an aethereal radiation, or within the atom. It meant further that the source could not be inexhaustible. By saying that all radioelements, including uranium, ultimately would change into an inactive end product, they satisfied this cornerstone of nineteenth-century physics" (ODNB). -- RUTHERFORD, Professor E. "The Nature of the a Particle." In: Memoirs and Proceedings of the Manchester Literary & Philosophical Society. (Manchester Memoirs.). Volume LIII. Manchester: [for the Society], 1909. 8o. (214 x 135 mm). Illustrated throughout. (Some spotting.) Contemporary half calf, gilt (extremities scuffed). FIRST EDITION, including many other articles on radiation by Rutherford. - SODDY, Frederick. The Interpretation of Radium. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1912. 8o. Illustrated. Original green cloth, gilt. Third edition, revised and enlarged. - COMPTON, Arthur. "Secondary Radiations produced by X-Rays." In: Bulletin of the National Research Council. Washington: The National Research Council, 1922. 8o. Illustrated. Original printed wrappers (chipped with minor loss at extremities). FIRST EDITION. -- MAKOWER, W and H. Geiger. Practical Measurements in Radio-Activity. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1912. 8o. Original blue cloth, gilt. FIRST EDITION. -- Another copy. (7) " /> [RADIATION]. RUTHERFORD, Professor E. (1871-1937). "The Magnetic and Electric Deviation of the easily absorbed Rays from Radium." In: <I>The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science</I>. Volume 5, Sixth Series. Pp. 177-187. London: Taylor and Francis, January-June 1903. 8<V>o (208 x 136 mm). Illustrated. (Preliminaries repaired in the gutter.) Later green cloth. FIRST EDITION. A pioneer in the study of radiation, it was during 1902-1903 that Rutherford and his colleague Frederick Soddy at Mcgill University in Toronto theorized that radiation depleted over time: "Rutherford and Soddy saw that [sources of radiation] actually had half-lives, though they were very long compared with human lifetimes, meaning that they contained relatively enormous numbers of atoms. If they were the Adam or Eve of a family their numbers and activities were actually declining, even if the changes could not then be measured. This insight allowed Rutherford and Soddy to overcome an obstacle to any theory of radioactivity: it must conform to the law of conservation of energy. This meant that the energy's source must be identified, be it sunlight, moving air molecules, an aethereal radiation, or within the atom. It meant further that the source could not be inexhaustible. By saying that <I>all</I> radioelements, including uranium, ultimately would change into an inactive end product, they satisfied this cornerstone of nineteenth-century physics" (<I>ODNB</I>). -- RUTHERFORD, Professor E. "The Nature of the <I>a</I> Particle." In: <I>Memoirs and Proceedings of the Manchester Literary & Philosophical Society. (Manchester Memoirs.)</I>. Volume LIII. Manchester: [for the Society], 1909. 8<V>o. (214 x 135 mm). Illustrated throughout. (Some spotting.) Contemporary half calf, gilt (extremities scuffed). FIRST EDITION, including many other articles on radiation by Rutherford. - SODDY, Frederick. <I>The Interpretation of Radium</I>. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1912. 8<V>o. Illustrated. Original green cloth, gilt. Third edition, revised and enlarged. - COMPTON, Arthur. "Secondary Radiations produced by X-Rays." In: <I>Bulletin of the National Research Council</I>. Washington: The National Research Council, 1922. 8<V>o. Illustrated. Original printed wrappers (chipped with minor loss at extremities). FIRST EDITION. -- MAKOWER, W and H. Geiger. <I>Practical Measurements in Radio-Activity</I>. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1912. 8<V>o. Original blue cloth, gilt. FIRST EDITION. -- Another copy. (7) | Christie's
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    Important Scientific Books: The Richard Green Library

    17 June 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 291

    [RADIATION]. RUTHERFORD, Professor E. (1871-1937). "The Magnetic and Electric Deviation of the easily absorbed Rays from Radium." In: The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science. Volume 5, Sixth Series. Pp. 177-187. London: Taylor and Francis, January-June 1903. 8o (208 x 136 mm). Illustrated. (Preliminaries repaired in the gutter.) Later green cloth. FIRST EDITION. A pioneer in the study of radiation, it was during 1902-1903 that Rutherford and his colleague Frederick Soddy at Mcgill University in Toronto theorized that radiation depleted over time: "Rutherford and Soddy saw that [sources of radiation] actually had half-lives, though they were very long compared with human lifetimes, meaning that they contained relatively enormous numbers of atoms. If they were the Adam or Eve of a family their numbers and activities were actually declining, even if the changes could not then be measured. This insight allowed Rutherford and Soddy to overcome an obstacle to any theory of radioactivity: it must conform to the law of conservation of energy. This meant that the energy's source must be identified, be it sunlight, moving air molecules, an aethereal radiation, or within the atom. It meant further that the source could not be inexhaustible. By saying that all radioelements, including uranium, ultimately would change into an inactive end product, they satisfied this cornerstone of nineteenth-century physics" (ODNB). -- RUTHERFORD, Professor E. "The Nature of the a Particle." In: Memoirs and Proceedings of the Manchester Literary & Philosophical Society. (Manchester Memoirs.). Volume LIII. Manchester: [for the Society], 1909. 8o. (214 x 135 mm). Illustrated throughout. (Some spotting.) Contemporary half calf, gilt (extremities scuffed). FIRST EDITION, including many other articles on radiation by Rutherford. - SODDY, Frederick. The Interpretation of Radium. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1912. 8o. Illustrated. Original green cloth, gilt. Third edition, revised and enlarged. - COMPTON, Arthur. "Secondary Radiations produced by X-Rays." In: Bulletin of the National Research Council. Washington: The National Research Council, 1922. 8o. Illustrated. Original printed wrappers (chipped with minor loss at extremities). FIRST EDITION. -- MAKOWER, W and H. Geiger. Practical Measurements in Radio-Activity. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1912. 8o. Original blue cloth, gilt. FIRST EDITION. -- Another copy. (7)

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    [RADIATION]. RUTHERFORD, Professor E. (1871-1937). "The Magnetic and Electric Deviation of the easily absorbed Rays from Radium." In: The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science. Volume 5, Sixth Series. Pp. 177-187. London: Taylor and Francis, January-June 1903. 8o (208 x 136 mm). Illustrated. (Preliminaries repaired in the gutter.) Later green cloth. FIRST EDITION. A pioneer in the study of radiation, it was during 1902-1903 that Rutherford and his colleague Frederick Soddy at Mcgill University in Toronto theorized that radiation depleted over time: "Rutherford and Soddy saw that [sources of radiation] actually had half-lives, though they were very long compared with human lifetimes, meaning that they contained relatively enormous numbers of atoms. If they were the Adam or Eve of a family their numbers and activities were actually declining, even if the changes could not then be measured. This insight allowed Rutherford and Soddy to overcome an obstacle to any theory of radioactivity: it must conform to the law of conservation of energy. This meant that the energy's source must be identified, be it sunlight, moving air molecules, an aethereal radiation, or within the atom. It meant further that the source could not be inexhaustible. By saying that all radioelements, including uranium, ultimately would change into an inactive end product, they satisfied this cornerstone of nineteenth-century physics" (ODNB). -- RUTHERFORD, Professor E. "The Nature of the a Particle." In: Memoirs and Proceedings of the Manchester Literary & Philosophical Society. (Manchester Memoirs.). Volume LIII. Manchester: [for the Society], 1909. 8o. (214 x 135 mm). Illustrated throughout. (Some spotting.) Contemporary half calf, gilt (extremities scuffed). FIRST EDITION, including many other articles on radiation by Rutherford. - SODDY, Frederick. The Interpretation of Radium. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1912. 8o. Illustrated. Original green cloth, gilt. Third edition, revised and enlarged. - COMPTON, Arthur. "Secondary Radiations produced by X-Rays." In: Bulletin of the National Research Council. Washington: The National Research Council, 1922. 8o. Illustrated. Original printed wrappers (chipped with minor loss at extremities). FIRST EDITION. -- MAKOWER, W and H. Geiger. Practical Measurements in Radio-Activity. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1912. 8o. Original blue cloth, gilt. FIRST EDITION. -- Another copy. (7)


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