1 page, folio. ONE KETTLE FOR EVERY SIX MEN: BILLETING AND PROVISIONING THE TROOPS. "...Pray inform the Major that I expect that the men march immediately. One kettle to be allowed to every six, agreeable to the resolutions of Congress from which I cannot deviate." Schuyler dates the letter 1775, but the contemporary docket on verso, dated 1776, is more likely correct. Washington did not name Schuyler a general in the Northern department until June 1775. -- SCHUYLER. Autograph letter signed ("Ph. Schuyler"), to Stephen Van Rensselaer, n.d. [ca. 1779]. 1 page, folio, small hole on left margin of first page, loss to address panel. SOME FAMILY COMBAT AND A REFERENCE TO JOHN JAY. "General Rensselaer is come up to divide the personal estate of his Father. Mrs. Schuyler insists upon my being present I suppose to afford her protection against the Old Lady. We had asked Mr. Stephen Bayard to dine with us...Ask Mr. Jay or any others you please to dine with you..." -- SCHUYLER. Autograph letter signed to Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philadelphia,17 April 1780. 1 page, folio, age-toned, closed tears at creases. "I have the honor to Instruct your Excellency to lay before Congress the Inclosed Bill drawn by M. G. [Major General] Sullivan on me...In the present state of affairs I should have deferred the application for a reimbursement to a further day and have added this to other charges which I have against the public for specie advances..." Schuyler's public service dated back to the French and Indian War, where he gained valuable experience as a quartermaster. His tenure in the Northern Department often found him at odds with Congress, and his colleagues (especially Horatio Gates). But his effective defense efforts on the northern frontier so exasperated the British they sent assassination squads to try (vainly) to kill him. Schuyler was the father-in-law of Alexander Hamilton. (3) " /> SCHULYER, Philip (1733-1804), <I>Major General, Continental Army</I>. Autograph letter signed ("P. Schuyler"), to Capt. Varick, 5 February [1776]. <I>1 page, folio</I>. ONE KETTLE FOR EVERY SIX MEN: BILLETING AND PROVISIONING THE TROOPS. "...Pray inform the Major that I expect that the men march immediately. One kettle to be allowed to every six, agreeable to the resolutions of Congress from which I cannot deviate." Schuyler dates the letter 1775, but the contemporary docket on verso, dated 1776, is more likely correct. Washington did not name Schuyler a general in the Northern department until June 1775. -- SCHUYLER. Autograph letter signed ("Ph. Schuyler"), to Stephen Van Rensselaer, n.d. [ca. 1779]. <I>1 page, folio, small hole on left margin of first page, loss to address panel</I>. SOME FAMILY COMBAT AND A REFERENCE TO JOHN JAY. "General Rensselaer is come up to divide the personal estate of his Father. Mrs. Schuyler insists upon my being present I suppose to afford her protection against the Old Lady. We had asked Mr. Stephen Bayard to dine with us...Ask Mr. Jay or any others you please to dine with you..." -- SCHUYLER. Autograph letter signed to Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philadelphia,17 April 1780. <I>1 page, folio, age-toned, closed tears at creases</I>. "I have the honor to Instruct your Excellency to lay before Congress the Inclosed Bill drawn by M. G. [Major General] Sullivan on me...In the present state of affairs I should have deferred the application for a reimbursement to a further day and have added this to other charges which I have against the public for specie advances..." Schuyler's public service dated back to the French and Indian War, where he gained valuable experience as a quartermaster. His tenure in the Northern Department often found him at odds with Congress, and his colleagues (especially Horatio Gates). But his effective defense efforts on the northern frontier so exasperated the British they sent assassination squads to try (vainly) to kill him. Schuyler was the father-in-law of Alexander Hamilton. (3) | Christie's
  • Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 1922

    Fine Printed Books and Manuscripts Including Americana

    3 December 2007, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 189

    SCHULYER, Philip (1733-1804), Major General, Continental Army. Autograph letter signed ("P. Schuyler"), to Capt. Varick, 5 February [1776]. 1 page, folio. ONE KETTLE FOR EVERY SIX MEN: BILLETING AND PROVISIONING THE TROOPS. "...Pray inform the Major that I expect that the men march immediately. One kettle to be allowed to every six, agreeable to the resolutions of Congress from which I cannot deviate." Schuyler dates the letter 1775, but the contemporary docket on verso, dated 1776, is more likely correct. Washington did not name Schuyler a general in the Northern department until June 1775. -- SCHUYLER. Autograph letter signed ("Ph. Schuyler"), to Stephen Van Rensselaer, n.d. [ca. 1779]. 1 page, folio, small hole on left margin of first page, loss to address panel. SOME FAMILY COMBAT AND A REFERENCE TO JOHN JAY. "General Rensselaer is come up to divide the personal estate of his Father. Mrs. Schuyler insists upon my being present I suppose to afford her protection against the Old Lady. We had asked Mr. Stephen Bayard to dine with us...Ask Mr. Jay or any others you please to dine with you..." -- SCHUYLER. Autograph letter signed to Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philadelphia,17 April 1780. 1 page, folio, age-toned, closed tears at creases. "I have the honor to Instruct your Excellency to lay before Congress the Inclosed Bill drawn by M. G. [Major General] Sullivan on me...In the present state of affairs I should have deferred the application for a reimbursement to a further day and have added this to other charges which I have against the public for specie advances..." Schuyler's public service dated back to the French and Indian War, where he gained valuable experience as a quartermaster. His tenure in the Northern Department often found him at odds with Congress, and his colleagues (especially Horatio Gates). But his effective defense efforts on the northern frontier so exasperated the British they sent assassination squads to try (vainly) to kill him. Schuyler was the father-in-law of Alexander Hamilton. (3)

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    SCHULYER, Philip (1733-1804), Major General, Continental Army. Autograph letter signed ("P. Schuyler"), to Capt. Varick, 5 February [1776]. 1 page, folio. ONE KETTLE FOR EVERY SIX MEN: BILLETING AND PROVISIONING THE TROOPS. "...Pray inform the Major that I expect that the men march immediately. One kettle to be allowed to every six, agreeable to the resolutions of Congress from which I cannot deviate." Schuyler dates the letter 1775, but the contemporary docket on verso, dated 1776, is more likely correct. Washington did not name Schuyler a general in the Northern department until June 1775. -- SCHUYLER. Autograph letter signed ("Ph. Schuyler"), to Stephen Van Rensselaer, n.d. [ca. 1779]. 1 page, folio, small hole on left margin of first page, loss to address panel. SOME FAMILY COMBAT AND A REFERENCE TO JOHN JAY. "General Rensselaer is come up to divide the personal estate of his Father. Mrs. Schuyler insists upon my being present I suppose to afford her protection against the Old Lady. We had asked Mr. Stephen Bayard to dine with us...Ask Mr. Jay or any others you please to dine with you..." -- SCHUYLER. Autograph letter signed to Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philadelphia,17 April 1780. 1 page, folio, age-toned, closed tears at creases. "I have the honor to Instruct your Excellency to lay before Congress the Inclosed Bill drawn by M. G. [Major General] Sullivan on me...In the present state of affairs I should have deferred the application for a reimbursement to a further day and have added this to other charges which I have against the public for specie advances..." Schuyler's public service dated back to the French and Indian War, where he gained valuable experience as a quartermaster. His tenure in the Northern Department often found him at odds with Congress, and his colleagues (especially Horatio Gates). But his effective defense efforts on the northern frontier so exasperated the British they sent assassination squads to try (vainly) to kill him. Schuyler was the father-in-law of Alexander Hamilton. (3)


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    Pre-Lot Text

    THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN