." /> TRUMAN, Harry S. Photograph signed ("Harry S. Truman"), as President, ALSO SIGNED BY TRUMAN'S CABINET ONE DAY AFTER THE NAGASAKI BOMBING AND RECEIPT OF THE FIRST JAPANESE PEACE OVERTURE, 10 August 1945. Black and white photo (10 5/8 x 13 7/8in.), signed along bottom margin, with identifying paper caption at bottom center of photograph</I>.|
  • Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 2272

    Fine Books & Manuscripts including Americana

    24 June 2009, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 108

    TRUMAN, Harry S. Photograph signed ("Harry S. Truman"), as President, ALSO SIGNED BY TRUMAN'S CABINET ONE DAY AFTER THE NAGASAKI BOMBING AND RECEIPT OF THE FIRST JAPANESE PEACE OVERTURE, 10 August 1945. Black and white photo (10 5/8 x 13 7/8in.), signed along bottom margin, with identifying paper caption at bottom center of photograph.

    Price Realised  

    TRUMAN, Harry S. Photograph signed ("Harry S. Truman"), as President, ALSO SIGNED BY TRUMAN'S CABINET ONE DAY AFTER THE NAGASAKI BOMBING AND RECEIPT OF THE FIRST JAPANESE PEACE OVERTURE, 10 August 1945. Black and white photo (10 5/8 x 13 7/8in.), signed along bottom margin, with identifying paper caption at bottom center of photograph.

    THE DEATH THROES OF THE JAPANESE WAR MACHINE. Truman and his top advisors posed for this photograph just before they received the first news of Japanese willingness to surrender, on 10 August 1945. Emperor Hirohito himself had to break a 3-3 vote in the Imperial Council over whether or not to surrender. But one stipulation was attached: the Emperor would remain in power. The American government responded on 12 August that Hirohito could remain in a purely ceremonial function, but subordinate to Allied military authority. A tense day passed in Washington and Tokyo. Japanese hard-liners urged a continuation of the war, even if it meant deposing the Emperor in a coup. Truman, impatient for Japan to admit defeat, ordered the resumption of heavy conventional bombing (he suspended, however, plans for any further atomic bombings). Thousands of civilians died in the 13 August raids, and the Army Air Force dropped leaflets over Tokyo explaining that only their Emperor's intransigence prolonged their suffering. Things at last came to a resolution: the pro-surrender faction violently suppressed the would-be coup plotters. The Emperor took the unprecedented step on 15 August of speaking directly to the Japanese people to announce the surrender. The most terrible war in human history was over at last.

    Also signing the photo are: Secretary of Agriculture Clinton Anderson; Labor Secretary Lewis Schwellenbach; National Housing Agency chief John Blandfield; War Production Board head Julius Krug; director of Office of War Mobilization and Reconversion John Snyder; director of office of Economic Stabilization William Davis; director of Foreign Economic Administration Leo Crowley; Commerce Secretary Henry A. Wallace; Under-Secretary of the Interior Abe Fortas; Postmaster General Robert Hannegan; Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson; Secretary of State James F. Byrnes; Treasury Secretary Fred Vinson; Attorney General Tom Clark; and Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal.


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