1 page, 4to, White House stationery, slight water stain along portion of top right edge (away from text)." /> TRUMAN, Harry S. Typed letter signed ("Harry S. Truman"), as President, to John W. Snyder, Washington, 19 July 1950. <I>1 page, 4to, White House stationery, slight water stain along portion of top right edge (away from text)</I>.|
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    Sale 2272

    Fine Books & Manuscripts including Americana

    24 June 2009, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 114

    TRUMAN, Harry S. Typed letter signed ("Harry S. Truman"), as President, to John W. Snyder, Washington, 19 July 1950. 1 page, 4to, White House stationery, slight water stain along portion of top right edge (away from text).

    Price Realised  

    TRUMAN, Harry S. Typed letter signed ("Harry S. Truman"), as President, to John W. Snyder, Washington, 19 July 1950. 1 page, 4to, White House stationery, slight water stain along portion of top right edge (away from text).

    TRUMAN SHAKES UP HIS NATIONAL SECURITY TEAM FOUR WEEKS AFTER THE START OF THE KOREAN WAR in this letter marked "Personal and confidential" to Snyder. "I have been considering the steps which are now necessary to make the National Security Council of maximum value in advising me as to the major policies required in the interest of our national security as a result of the present international situation." Recent meetings of the N.S.C., Truman complains, have "been so large that I feel it has discouraged free discussion. I therefore direct that the Council meet regularly every Thursday with the Secretary of State presiding in my absence and additional attendance confined to the Secretary of the Treasury [Snyder], Mr. [Averill] Harriman, Mr. Souers," as well as the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the head of the C.I.A. "Participation by other officials will be only with my specific approval..."

    This letter marks a radical change in the way Truman handled foreign policy and national security matters. In his first five years as President, he paid very little attention to the N.S.C. But now, in 1950, with the country in full-scale war in Korea, and locked in a dangerous arms race with the Soviets, Truman wanted better coordination and control over his national security bureaucracy. And he made sure that his most trusted and respected advisors--Snyder, Averill Harriman and Secretary of State Dean Acheson--would play leading roles in running the N.S.C. and controlling the policy-making process.


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