• Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 12455

    European Furniture & Works of Art

    6 July 2016, London, King Street

  • Lot 75

    A LOUIS XV ORMOLU AND PATINATED BRONZE MANTEL CLOCK ('PENDULE A L'ELEPHANT')

    ATTRIBUTED TO JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN, THE MOVEMENT BY CHARLES LE ROY, PARIS, MID-18TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A LOUIS XV ORMOLU AND PATINATED BRONZE MANTEL CLOCK ('PENDULE A L'ELEPHANT')
    ATTRIBUTED TO JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN, THE MOVEMENT BY CHARLES LE ROY, PARIS, MID-18TH CENTURY
    The drum case surmounted by foliage and a seated puto, above an elephant on a naturalistic base, the white enamel dial signed 'CHARLES LE ROY / A PARIS', the twin-barrel movement with verge escapement and silk suspension, numbered countwheel and strike to bell, further signed 'Chles. Le Roy A Paris'
    19 ½ in. (49.5 cm.) high; 15 in. (38 cm.) wide; 6 ½ in. (16.5 cm.) deep


    Contact Client Service
    • info@christies.com

    • New York +1 212 636 2000

    • London +44 (0)20 7839 9060

    • Hong Kong +852 2760 1766

    • Shanghai +86 21 6355 1766

    Contact the department

    Two clocks of almost identical design and signed by Saint-Germain are recorded: one is in the Residenz, Munich (illustrated in H. Ottomeyer, P. Pröschel et al., Vergoldete Bronzen, vol II, Munich, 1986, p. 123, fig. 2.8.3.), the other, with a movement by Jean-Baptiste du Tertrem, was sold Christie's, New York, 1 January 1990, lot 64.
    Elected as a maître-fondeur on 15 July 1748, Saint-Germain enjoyed the privilege of an ouvrier libre - enabling him to act both as an ébéniste and bronzier. He frequently supplied cases cast with animal forms and allegorical figures to the leading clockmakers of Paris, including the le Roy workshops, Etienne Lenoir and Jean-Philippe Gosselin. The quality of chasing and modelling in Saint-Germain's animal and foliate decorated cases also suggests close study of the natural world.

    Provenance

    Acquired by the philanthropist and collector Ogden Mills (1857-1929) for his Parisian residence, 73 rue de Varenne, circa 1910-1915.
    Inherited by his daughter, Beatrice, the Countess of Granard (1883-1972).
    Thence by descent.


    Pre-Lot Text

    Property of a Lady of Title (lots 4, 6, 25, 51, 75)