• European Noble and Private Col auction at Christies

    Sale 2835

    European Noble and Private Collections

    15 - 16 December 2009, Amsterdam

  • Lot 438

    A SOUTH GERMAN MAHOGANY DOUBLE-DIAL, QUARTER-STRIKING, YEAR-GOING LONGCASE CLOCK WITH PERPETUAL CALENDAR AND EQUATION OF TIME

    THE MOVEMENT BY PHILIPP MATTHÄUS HAHN, CIRCA 1780; THE CASE ATTRIBUTED TO JOHANNES KLINCKERFUß, CIRCA 1810

    Price Realised  

    A SOUTH GERMAN MAHOGANY DOUBLE-DIAL, QUARTER-STRIKING, YEAR-GOING LONGCASE CLOCK WITH PERPETUAL CALENDAR AND EQUATION OF TIME
    THE MOVEMENT BY PHILIPP MATTHÄUS HAHN, CIRCA 1780; THE CASE ATTRIBUTED TO JOHANNES KLINCKERFUß, CIRCA 1810
    The mahogany veneered spreading case with a trunkdoor to the front, resting on four patinated metal claw feet above a plinth base, the hood surmounted by triangular pediments and eared corners, a door to each side, the front and reverse with a glazed door showing the dials. The front with a blue painted brass dialplate, surrounded by a brass band and with figural spandrels to the corners depicting mythological figures and a male and female rivergod below, the white, black and red-painted Arabic and Roman dial signed above the seconds ring von Pfarrer Hahn in Kornwestheim 1780, dot minute markers and rozette five minute markers, pierced ormolu hour hands and blued steel seconds hand, a comprehensive 'Equation of time' table (Zeitgleichungstabelle) with two outer concentric circles with dates and months to the centre and inscribed with explanation Die Schwarze Zahlen sind monaths tage Die rote darunter Sind die abweichung der Söne von der pendul Zeiten Menuten Das Zeichen - Zeigt an, das die rothe Zahlen von der pendul Zeit abgezogen, das x aber diefelbe addirt werden müfe, um die Soe Zeit Zuwisfen Folg: Kan man nach der mit-tags Lienie oder nach einer ackuraten Soen Uhr sehen wie viel der Menuten Zeiger vorlau-ffen, oder zuruk sein muss wen sie richtig gehen soll oder wie viel die Sönen Zeit in jedem tage des Jahres ift, the brass banded arch above with perpetual calendar and phases of the moon, white painted calendar ring and blue painted moonphase with brass penny moon and inscribed erst: Viert:-neumond-lez: Viert:, two further arches below inscribed zunehmen des Monds and abnehmen des Monds, the reverse with a circular white painted Roman and Arabic dial with dot minute markers and sword-handle five minute markers, pierced ormolu hands, the two train weight-driven year-going movement with gut lines, pin-wheel escapement (Stiftenhemmung), spring suspension with pendulum adjustment, grande sonnerie strike on a double countwheel with a single hammer on two bells, one bell mounted on a swivel lever -typical Hahn striking mechanism- (Doppelschloßscheibe Schlagwerk mit Neigung einer Glocke), the perpetual calendar and phases of the moon connected via wheelwork mounted to the reverse of the arch, the hands to the reverse-dial separately connected via a single arbor to the movement; wood-rod pendulum with detachable brass pendulum bob; two large weights, crank key, trunkdoor key, hood frontdoor-key, watch key for adjustment; on a modern painted wood pedestal base
    The clock: 192 cm. high overall
    The modern pedestal base: 76 cm. high


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    The present lot is the only clock known to have been executed by Hahn with a dial to each side, and is most probably a special commission. Possibly the dial to the reverse was meant to show the sidereal-time.


    Clocks by Hahn are in the collections of:
    Landesmuseum Württemberg, Stuttgart
    Hessisches Landesmuseum, Darmstadt
    Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg
    Philipp-Matthäus Hahn Museum, Albstadt (Onstmettingen)
    Schloss Ludwigsburg, Ludwigsburg
    Herzogliche Bibliothek, Ludwigsburg
    Historisches Museum (Kirschgartenmuseum), Basel

    Related clock cases by Johannes Klinckerfuß are in the collection of:
    Schloss Ludwigsburg, Ludwigsburg
    Villa Reitzenstein (Staatsministerium), Stuttgart
    Neues Schloss (Finanzministerium), Stuttgart

    Related clocks by Hahn were sold:
    Koller, Zürich, Doppelglobus-Uhr, circa 1785 signed Invenit P. Hahn Echterdingen, March 2008, sale 1296, lot 144 for 334,100 Euro
    Sotheby's New York, A gilt-metal pocketwatch with full calendar, 14 October 2004, Masterpieces from the Time Museum, lot 943, $ 13,200 Sotheby's London Olympia, A gilt and silvered brass, steel and enamel mechanical equinoctial equation dial, circa 1785, 30 Oct 02, Sale 2898, lot 30, GBP 18,800

    Comparative Literature:
    A. Ricklefs, C. Väterlein et al., Philipp Matthäus Hahn 1739-1790, Stuttgart, 1989, Vol. I and Vol. II, exhibition catalogue of the Württembergisches Landesmuseum, Stuttgart
    Uhren aus den württembergischen Schlössern in Stuttgart und Ludwigsburg, 'Schätze aus unseren Schlössern, Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden Württemberg, Vol. 5, Weinheim 2001
    E. Anthes Philipp Matthäus Hahn Konstrukteur und Hersteller von Instrumenten, Ludwigsburg
    H. Kainer, Philipp Matthaus Hahn, Swabian Clockmaker, Munich 1990
    A. Leiter, Die Pforzheimer Uhrenmanufaktur von 1767 bis 1790: Neue Erkentnisse durch Publikationen über Philipp Matthäus Hahn 1739-1790, Wiesbaden 1993
    Hermann Schmitz ed. , Deutsche Möbel des Klassizismus, Stuttgart 1923
    W. Wiese, Johannes Klinckerfuß, Ein württembergischer Ebenist (1770-1831), Sigmaringen, 1988.


    Philipp Matthäus Hahn (1739 - + 1790)

    Hahn was born on 25 November 1739 as the eldest son of a protestant pastor in the South German town Scharnhausen auf den Fildern (a small town 5 kilometers from Esslingen and 15 kilometers from Stuttgart). At home the young Philipp already received lessons in reading, writing and mathematics as well as Latin, Greek and Hebrew. At the age of twelve Philipp Matthäus attended the Lateinschule in Esslingen, followed in 1752 by a short intermezzo in one of the Württenbergische monastic schools, where he failed to pass the exams. Instead he went to a religious preparation school Vorbereitungsschule für die niedrige Geistlichkeit in Nürtingen. In this period he already developed his broad interest in science.
    From 1756 onwards he studied theology at Tübingen University. In 1759 he graduated at the age of twenty, in this period Hahn was not only specialized in theology, but also wrote articles on science, astronomy, chemistry and alchemy. His first designs for microscopes, telescopes, his calculator and off course clocks are dating from this period. From 1760 to 1765 he worked as a private teacher in Lorch and as a curate in Breitenholz, Herrenberg, Tieringen and Pfäffingen.
    In 1770 Hahn was appointed as pastor in Onstmettingen, succeeding his father.
    In Onstmettingen his first instruments, calculators and clocks were built. A small workshop developed and his famous calculator was build there amongst some complicated astronomical clocks. In this period he also attracted the attention of the German courts of Kaiser Josef II, the Duke Carl August of Sachsen-Weimar and Duke Carl Eugen von Württemberg, who entitled Hahn as the 'divine clockmaker' Uhrmacher Gottes.
    Under the influence of Duke Carl Eugen, Hahn moved to Kornwestheim around 1780.
    Hahn settled himself and his family in Kornwestheim, and it was there he built a large and proper workshop and his production of highly complicated movements and instruments flourished.
    It is here to mention that next to the activity as a clockmaker and instrument maker Hahn still worked as pastor in Echterdingen, he published a lot of theological treatises and published various works on clocks, science and astronomy. Hahn finally established two workshops, one in Kornwestheim and one in Echterdingen which also enabled his brothers and sons to work as clockmakers and mechanics.
    Around this time Hahn was settled as a famous and well-known pastor, astronomer, mechanic and clockmaker and was established within the courts and nobility through his complicated clocks and astronomical inventions, and within the higher-class through his pocket watches, calculators and scales.
    These widespread relationships included close ties to the court of Duke Carl Eugen von Württemberg. The relationship and protection of the Duke enabled Hahn to withstand the pressure of the ecclesial government and gave him the opportunities to focus on his clock making and his technical, scientific and astronomical interest, next to the theological challenges and questions.
    Philipp Matthäus Hahn died on 2nd of May 1790 in Echterdingen, leaving an important heritage of highly skilled and complicated scientific instruments and clocks.


    Johannes Klinckerfuß (1770- + 1831)
    Johannes Klinckerfuß was one of the most important German cabinet makers of the early 19th century. After his apprenticeship he started in 1789 in the workshop of David Roentgen in Neuwied. He soon became famous for his craftsmanship and creative flair, and was recommended by Roentgen to the Bayreuther Hof of Herzog Friedrich Eugen von Württemberg, where he was in charge of the furnishing of Schloss Fantaisie. From 1795 onwards Klinckerfuß worked in the herzogliche Kabinettschreinerei for the Stuttgarter Hof, where he became cabinet-ebenist for Duke Frederick II of Württemberg, later the first king of Württemberg. In 1812 Klinckerfuß opened his own workshop in Stuttgart. He made numerous important pieces in the Empire style. Many of these still remain in the castles Weil near Esslingen, Ludwigsburg and Rosenstein.


    A clock of virtual identical outline and design by Johannes Klinckerfuß, now in the collection of Schloss Ludwigsburg, is illustrated in:
    Uhren aus den württembergischen Schlössern in Stuttgart und Ludwigsburg, 'Schätze aus unseren Schlössern, Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden Württemberg, Vol. 5, Weinheim 2001, p. 135, cat nr. 79 Bodenstanduhr
    and Hermann Schmitz ed., Deutsche Möbel des Klassizismus, Stuttgart 1923, p. 113

    Clocks of closely related design are illustrated in:
    Uhren aus den württembergischen Schlössern in Stuttgart und Ludwigsburg, 'Schätze aus unseren Schlössern, Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden Württemberg, Vol. 5, Weinheim 2001, p. 120-121, cat. nrs 67-71 and p. 134-137, cat. nrs. 78-81
    A. Ricklefs, C. Väterlein et al., Philipp Matthäus Hahn 1739-1790, Stuttgart, 1989, Vol II, exhibition catalogue of the Württembergisches Landesmuseum, Stuttgart, p. 447, fig 16
    R. Mühe, H.M. Vogel, alte Uhren, ein Handbuch europäischer Tischuhren, Wanduhren und Bodenstanduhren, München, 1981, p. 270-271, ill. 545

    Special Notice

    Christie’s charges a premium to the buyer on the Hammer Price of each lot sold at the following rates: 29.75% of the Hammer Price of each lot up to and including €20,000, plus 23.8% of the Hammer Price between €20,001 and €800.000, plus 14.28% of any amount in excess of €800.000. Buyer’s premium is calculated on the basis of each lot individually.


    Pre-Lot Text

    THE PROPERTY OF A SWABIAN COLLECTOR


    Literature

    A. Ricklefs, C. Väterlein et al., Philipp Matthäus Hahn 1739-1790, 'Exhibition catalogue of the Württembergisches Landesmuseum', Stuttgart 1989, Vol. I, p. 444-445, catalogue number 3.44 Astronomische Bodenstanduhr and Vol.II, p. 446-447, fig 15.
    The present lot is illustrated and fully described in this exhibition catalogue.