• English Furniture and Clocks auction at Christies

    Sale 7769

    English Furniture and Clocks

    19 November 2009, London, King Street

  • Lot 6

    A VICTORIAN ENGRAVED GILT-BRASS EIGHT DAY TIMEPIECE STRUT CLOCK WITH CALENDARS

    W. VASEL, LONDON; RETAILED BY GOLDSMITHS & SILVERSMITHS COMPANY, LONDON. LATE 19TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    A VICTORIAN ENGRAVED GILT-BRASS EIGHT DAY TIMEPIECE STRUT CLOCK WITH CALENDARS
    W. VASEL, LONDON; RETAILED BY GOLDSMITHS & SILVERSMITHS COMPANY, LONDON. LATE 19TH CENTURY
    CASE: florally engraved all over, pivoted handle, with fixed winding key and pivoted strut to the rear, shuttered hand set and regulation apertures and signed 'W.V.' DIAL: silvered and florally engraved, chapter ring signed 'GOLDSMITHS & SILVERSMITHS COMP./REGENT ST. LONDON', subsidiary rings for day and date, secret oval maker's stamp 'W. VASEL/LONDON' below engraved dial mask, blued steel hands MOVEMENT: single going barrel, cut bimetallic balance to lever platform escapement; setting key TRAVEL CASE: gilt-tooled green leather travel/display case, with front-opening doors and easel support; concealed key compartment
    6¾ in. (17.5 cm.) high; 5½ in. (14 cm.) wide; 1¼ in. (3cm.) deep)


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    A late Victorian maker of repute, Vasel is recorded working at several addresses in London from 1886-1907.
    Strut clocks were first designed and popularised by the great Victorian carriage clockmaker Thomas Cole (1800-1864) and derive their name from their rear pivoted strut support. J.B. Hawkins (Thomas Cole and Victorian Clockmaking, Woodbridge, 1975, pp.159-165) suggests Cole first conceived the idea circa 1845 and that these clocks were the mainstay of his business until his death in 1864. They gained their popularity from their flatness, or thinness, as they were more portable than the square bulk of traditional carriage clocks.
    Cole's clocks were often signed by their retailers, such as C. F. Hancock, Asprey and Garrard. They were produced during his lifetime and generally had hidden stamps identifying them as Cole's work. Vasel, along with makers such as Edward White, copied Cole's style of strut clock in the late 19th and early 20th Century and it is interesting to note that he continued the tradition of the 'secret' signature. Hawkins (pp. 160-164, items 58-60) illustrates three examples with similar cases to the present clock, although with slight variations to the engraving.
    A comparable strut clock by Vasel, retailed by London and Ryder, was sold anonymously, Christie's London, 14 June 2000, lot 4.

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    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    Sold anonynously, Christie's South Kensington, 28 April 1995, lot 242