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    Sale 7727

    Important English Furniture and Clocks

    4 June 2009, London, King Street

  • Lot 81

    A WILLIAM AND MARY BRASS-MOUNTED EBONY STRIKING EIGHT DAY TABLE CLOCK WITH PULL QUARTER REPEAT AND UNUSUAL PENDULUM LOCKING SYSTEM

    DANIEL QUARE, LONDON. CIRCA 1690

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A WILLIAM AND MARY BRASS-MOUNTED EBONY STRIKING EIGHT DAY TABLE CLOCK WITH PULL QUARTER REPEAT AND UNUSUAL PENDULUM LOCKING SYSTEM
    DANIEL QUARE, LONDON. CIRCA 1690
    CASE: the cushion-moulded top with eagle and foliate brass mounts to front and rear and with silk-backed foliate and bird brass frets to the sides, the front door with silk-backed pierced fret to upper rail and matching brass foliate escutcheons to the side rails, silk-backed frets to the sides above glazed panels, on brass claw feet; two case keys
    DIAL: the 6¾ in. square gilt-brass dial with upper rings for pendulum regulation and strike/silent and lower rings for Pen. Fast/Pen. Loose, all with gilt foliate centres and fine blued steel hands and set within foliate spandrels, the silvered chapter ring with sword hilt half hour markers and signed 'D: Quare London', the finely matted centre with cup-and-ring decoration and engraving to the false pendulum aperture, ringed winding holes, finely pierced and chased blued steel hands
    MOVEMENT: with seven ringed pillars, twin chain fusees with verge escapement, hour strike on bell and pull quarter repeat on further bell, the back plate with scored line border and scroll and foliate engraving around a cartouche signed 'Daniell Quare/Londini fecit', Quare-type engraved brass click springs, spring-suspended pendulum regulated by rack-and-pinion system, a pair of steel arms at the base of the back plate articulating to secure the pendulum bob and operated from the dial, secured to the case via steel side brackets and by later steel brackets to the base; winding key
    14½ in. (37 cm.) high, handle down; 10¼ in. (26 cm.) wide; 6½ in. (16.5 cm.) deep


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    COMPARATIVE LITERATURE:
    Eric Bruton, The Wetherfield Collection of Clocks, NAG Press, 1981.
    P.G. Dawson, C.B. Drover & D.W. Parkes, Early English Clocks, Woodbridge, 1982.
    Percy Dawson, The Iden Clock Collection, Woodbridge, 1987.

    The four subsidiary dials on the present clock are an unusual feature and appear to have been reserved for Quare's more important clocks. There are examples in both the Iden (p. 128) and Wetherfield (p. 96, also Dawson, Drover and Parkes, p. 477, plate 705). Although similar in their design, not all subsidiaries perform the same function on each clock. For example, the clock illustrated in the Iden collection differs from the present clock in having the upper subsidiaries perform regulation and repeat/not repeat, the lower right subsidiary strike/silent and only the lower left operating the pendulum locking system. A Quare table clock of almost identical design (but with a date aperture) sold anonymously, Sotheby's, London 9 December 1968, lot 193 (£3,800).
    A three train example is illustrated on the front cover of Antiquarian Horology, No. 2, Vol. 2, June 1959. The most recent Quare table clock with four subsidiaries to appear at auction had an inverted bell top case and was sold anonymously, Christie's, London, 11 December 2002, lot 76 (£77,675).
    It is also interesting to compare this design with a Fromanteel gilt-brass mounted tortoiseshell grande sonnerie table clock dating from circa 1695 which is illustrated on the front cover of the Iden collection and illustrated p.48.
    Daniel Quare (c.1649-1724) became one of the most illustrious clockmakers of England's golden age of horology. The earliest record of him is his appearance in the minutes of a Clockmakers' Company Quarter Court on 3 April 1671, when he was admitted as a Brother of the Company. In 1698, Quare was selected as a member of the Court of Assistants of the Clockmakers' Company. In 1705 he was made Junior Warden and he subsequently rose through the ranks to become Master in 1708.
    George I offered Quare the post of King's Watchmaker for £300 per year. However, being a Quaker by religion he was unable to swear the necessary Oath of Allegiance. Even so, the King allowed him free access to the Palace at any time.
    In 1701 Quare took his former apprentice, Stephen Horseman, into partnership and towards the end retired to Croydon, where he died in 1724.

    See also lot 31

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Pre-Lot Text

    THE PROPERTY OF A NOBLEMAN