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    Sale 12159

    Post-War & Contemporary Art Afternoon Sale

    16 November 2016, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 445

    Sol LeWitt (1928-2007)

    Six Drawings: straight lines, approximately one inch long

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    Sol LeWitt (1928-2007)
    Six Drawings: straight lines, approximately one inch long
    each signed, titled and dated:
    i. 'Straight lines, approximately one inch long, drawn horizontally and vertically, at random, within a rectangle. September 24, 1970 Sol Lewitt' (lower left)
    ii. 'Straight lines, approximately one inch long, drawn diagonally left to right and diagonally right to left, at random, within a rectangle. September 30, 1970 Sol Lewitt' (lower left)
    iii. 'Straight lines, approximately one inch long, drawn horizontally, and diagonally left to right, at random within a rectangle Sept 25, 1970 Sol Lewitt' (lower left)
    iv. 'Straight lines approximately one inch long, drawn horizontally and diagonally right to left, at random, within a rectangle Sept 26, 1970 Sol Lewitt' (lower left)
    v. 'Straight lines, approximately one inch long, drawn vertically and diagonally left to right at random within a rectangle September 27, 1970 Sol Lewitt' (lower left)
    vi. 'Straight lines, approximately one inch long, drawn vertically and diagonally right to left, at random, within a rectangle. September 28, 1970 Sol Lewitt' (lower left)
    six elements--ink on paper
    each: 17 x 21 in. (43.1 x 53.3 cm.)
    Drawn in 1970.


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    “Because of the possibilities for multiplication inherent in the grid form, a basic and seemingly unlimited vocabulary was at LeWitt's disposal... [the] serial form produced multipart pieces of finite order but infinite complexity” (A. Legg, Sol LeWitt, exh. cat., Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1984, p. 9).

    “When an artist uses a conceptual form of art, it means that all of the planning and decisions are made beforehand and the execution is a perfunctory affair. The idea becomes a machine that makes the art... Conceptual art is not necessarily logical. The logic of a piece or series of pieces is a device that is used at times only to be ruined. Logic may be used to camouflage the real intent of the artist, to lull the viewer into the belief that he understands the work, or to infer a paradoxical situation (such as logic vs. illogic)... Ideas are discovered by intuition.” – Sol LeWitt

    Provenance

    John Weber Gallery, New York
    The Dunkelman Gallery, Toronto, 1971
    Private collection, Michigan
    Anon. sale; Sotheby's, New York, 11 November 1993, lot 118
    Acquired at the above sale by the present owner


    Saleroom Notice

    Please note the estimate for this work is $60,000-80,000.


    Pre-Lot Text

    PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE AMERICAN COLLECTION


    Exhibited

    New York, Museum of Modern Art; Montreal, Museum of Contemporary Art; Champaign, Krannert Museum of Art, University of Illinois; Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art and La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, Sol LeWitt, February 1978-August 1979, no. 67.