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    Sale 7560

    Furniture and Carpets Including Two Private Collections

    24 January 2008, London, King Street

  • Lot 212

    A CHARLES II SNAKEWOOD, PINE AND OAK COMMODE

    CIRCA 1670

    Price Realised  

    A CHARLES II SNAKEWOOD, PINE AND OAK COMMODE
    CIRCA 1670
    The rectangular moulded top above a frieze drawer with central tapering panel, above a drawer with two protruding panels, above two further drawers with geometric mouldings, on elm bun feet, the metalwork apparently original, the feet replaced, the top probably replaced
    43¾ in. (111 cm.) high; 45 in. (114 cm.) wide; 25½ in. (65 cm.) deep


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    Snakewood (Piratinera guianensis) was imported from the British Guyanese colony known as Willoughbyland, from 1663, named after Francis, Lord Willoughby of Parnham, its Governor from 1650. In 1667, under the terms of the Treaty of Breda, the colony was exchanged with the Dutch colony New Amsterdam, promptly renamed New York, and Willoughbyland renamed Surinam. Snakewood was used quite widely in English cabinet-making in the second half of the 17th century, however by 1675 imports had virtually ceased. A closely-related chest is in the Victoria & Albert Museum (A. Bowett, 'Snakewood in 17th Century Furniture Making', Antique Collecting, May 1997, pp. 26-29).

    Special Notice

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    Provenance

    Anonymous sale, Sotheby's New York, 11 October 1996, lot 280.