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    Sale 2034

    19th Century Furniture, Sculpture, Works of Art and Ceramics

    21 October 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 273

    A FRENCH BRONZE-MOUNTED IVORY, BRASS AND STAINED FRUITWOOD MARQUETRY CACHEPOT**

    BY MAISON GIROUX, THE DESIGN BY FERDINAND DUVINAGE, LAST QUARTER 19TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    A FRENCH BRONZE-MOUNTED IVORY, BRASS AND STAINED FRUITWOOD MARQUETRY CACHEPOT**
    BY MAISON GIROUX, THE DESIGN BY FERDINAND DUVINAGE, LAST QUARTER 19TH CENTURY
    Decorated overall with blossoming branches and perched pheasants, the rim signed ALPH. GIROUX PARIS, the ivory etched FD Bte
    10 1/8 in. (26 cm.) high; 12 5/8 in. (32 cm.) diameter


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    Though founded in the 1790s by François-Simon-Alphonse Giroux, the firm began regularly manufacturing fine furniture in the 1840s under the direction of his son Alphonse-Gustave. Popularly known as 'Maison Giroux' during the second half of the 19th century, the firm came under the direction of Ferdinand Duvinage and his partner Harinkouck in 1867. Under his joint, and later sole, direction the firm participated in consecutive International Exhibitions.

    Following Duvinage's death in the previous year, his widow, Madame Rosalie, filed a patent in 1877 for what she described as 'une mosaïque combiné avec cloisonnement métallique'. Mounted with brass, ivory and stained fruitwoods, pieces integrating the patented technique are identified by an etched FD and Bte in superscript indicating breveté, or 'patent'. Signed works embellished with the unique method were first exhibited to great acclaim at the 1878 Exposition Universelle in Paris.

    Having firmly established a name in luxury furnishings and ornamentation, Maison Giroux, under the direction of Madame Rosalie, produced an increasing number of decorations utilizing the signature technique, some of which are preserved in private and museum collections. The firm's magnificent cabinet-on-stand, now housed at the Musée d'Orsay, and an occasional table residing at The Art Institute of Chicago are excellent examples incorporating ormolu, ivory, brass, pewter and silvered- and gilt-copper. However, the artist's intricate Japanese-inspired designs were not exclusively reserved for furnishings and the firm produced a variety of decorations and table accoutrements, much like the present cache-pot. A fine ormolu-mounted cache-pot was sold Sotheby's, New York, The Collection of Gianni Versace, 21 May 2005 ($38,400) and a nearly identical example to the present lot was sold Sotheby's, Paris, 9 April 2008, lot 259 (53,050).

    Special Notice

    Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.


    Literature

    D. Kisluk-Grosheid, 'Maison Giroux and its 'Oriental' Marquetry Technique', Furniture History: The Journal of The Furniture History Society, 1998, Vol. 34, pp. 146-72.