• Property from the Collection o auction at Christies

    Sale 7819

    Property from the Collection of HRH The Prince George, Duke of Kent KG, KT, and HRH Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent CI, GCVO and their families

    20 November 2009, London, King Street

  • Lot 44

    A GEORGE I GILT-GESSO, BLACK AND GOLD LACQUER SIDE TABLE

    CIRCA 1720 AND LATER

    Price Realised  

    A GEORGE I GILT-GESSO, BLACK AND GOLD LACQUER SIDE TABLE
    CIRCA 1720 AND LATER
    The later top inset with an early 18th century Chinese lacquer panel within a foliate and scallop shell border, above a conforming shaped frieze on cabriole legs with pad feet, four legs spliced and the feet re-shaped, re-gilt, possibly previously with a marble top, the reverse with a label 'H.R.H. The Duke of Kent K.G., from J.M. Botibol, 28 & 30 Hammery Street, W1', the underside with a label 'E.R.II, Buckingham Palace, L.C.D.' inscribed in ink 'Prince Michael', the underside inscribed in pencil '3622'
    30¼ in. (77 cm.) high; 35½ in. (90 cm.) wide; 21 in. (53.5 cm.) deep


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    This unusual and exotic 'Indian' pier table would originally have accompanied a mirror to form a bedroom apartment pier-set, such as the silvered gesso table bearing the arms of Meller supplied by John Belchier (d.1753) in 1723 for Erddig, Wales. Its rare combination of gilt-gesso and lacquer recalls the celebrated Royal prototypes supplied by Gerrit Jensen and Thomas Pelletier for Queen Anne's use at St. James's Palace following her accession in 1702. They are recorded in the Lord Chamberlain's Papers for 1704-5: 'Gerrit Jensen, Cabinet Maker...At St. James's...For making up two tables of the tops of the Indian cabinet with carv'd guilded frames to them..£44.

    This unusual combination is also seen on the celebrated dressing table at Longford Castle, Wiltshire, which was probably supplied for Sir Jacob de Bouverie (created 1st Viscount Folkestone in 1747) when he succeeded his brother in 1736 (R. Edwards, ed., The Dictionary of English Furniture, rev.ed., 1954, vol. III, p. 225, fig. 6). Lord Folkestone employed many of the leading London cabinet-makers of his day, notably Benjamin Goodison, who was apprenticed to James Moore from about 1720 and succeeded him as cabinet-maker to the Royal household.

    The paper storage label was applied by the Lord Chamberlain's Department, when the table was stored at Buckingham Palace.

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    Acquired by The Prince George, Duke of Kent (1902-1942) from J.M. Botibol, London.
    Buckingham Palace, London and by then descent.