• Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 5936

    The Country House Sale - Property of the 14th Earl of Kintore & The Collection of the Late Bernard Lyons, C.B.E.

    18 March 2009, London, South Kensington

  • Lot 190

    A GEORGE II MAHOGANY DESK

    ATTRIBUTED TO WRIGHT & ELWICK, THIRD QUARTER 18TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A GEORGE II MAHOGANY DESK
    ATTRIBUTED TO WRIGHT & ELWICK, THIRD QUARTER 18TH CENTURY
    The rectangular moulded top above a blind-fretwork secretaire frieze drawer with a slide inset with a gilt-tooled fawn leather-lined writing-surface, above a mahogany-lined interior with divisions, a pen tray and a fold-out compartment with ink pot divisions, above a central recessed door enclosing a shelf, flanked by foliate-carved tapering pilasters and doors with later blind-fretwork arched panels, each enclosing two drawers, above a gadrooned frieze, on shaped bracket feet carved with C-scrolls and foliage, the secretaire drawer previously but not originally with handles, the feet previously with castors
    31 in. (79 cm.) high; 52¾ in. (134 cm.) wide; 24½ in. (62 cm.) deep


    Contact Client Service
    • info@christies.com

    • New York +1 212 636 2000

    • London +44 (0)20 7839 9060

    • Hong Kong +852 2760 1766

    • Shanghai +86 21 6355 1766

    This desk relates to the George II 'Modern' fashioned 'Writing table' executed around 1750 by Thomas Chippendale (d.1779) and illustrated in his Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director, 1754, pl.52. As in Chippendale's Director pattern, the arched panelled doors of this desk are flanked by projecting pilasters and filigreed with a triumphal-arched trellis of ribbon-frets. Its 'picturesque' herm-tapered and flower-festooned pilasters also relate to those of Chippendale's 'Slab Table' pattern (Household Furniture, 1760, pl.29), while its feet appear to derive from those featured in his 'Chinese Sopha' pattern (Director, pl. 25). This amalgamation of Chippendale designs, suggests this desk may be by the firm of Wright and Elwick, cabinet-makers from Wakefield, Yorkshire, who imitated many of the Director designs whilst incorporating their own idiosyncracies. A bombé commode, attributed to Wright and Elwick, sold in the Wentworth Woodhouse sale, Christie's, 8 July 1998, lot 65, has a gadrooned edge which is comparable with the current desk's deep-relief-carved gadrooned apron.

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    Acquired from Mallets, London.