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    Sale 1993

    Important English Furniture

    25 April 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 40

    A GEORGE III CUT-GLASS AND ORMOLU EIGHT-LIGHT CHANDELIER

    ATTRIBUTED TO PARKER AND PERRY, LATE 18TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    A GEORGE III CUT-GLASS AND ORMOLU EIGHT-LIGHT CHANDELIER
    ATTRIBUTED TO PARKER AND PERRY, LATE 18TH CENTURY
    The pierced trefoil suspension ring above a domed canapy hung with pendant swags and faceted drops, the baluster shaft with lozenge-cut decoration and central spirally-fluted dome urn with entrelac and rosette ormolu collar above a further faceted and lozenge-cut tapering shaft
    48 in. (122 cm.) high, 33 in. (84 cm.) diameter


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    This distinctive arm pattern, with double-curved candle-arm and scalloped nozzle has been identified by Martin Mortimer as characteristic of the oeuvre of Messrs. Parker and Perry (The English Glass Chandelier, Woodbridge, 2000, p.19, pls.10, 48 and 53-55). Founded by William Parker (d.1784), the business flourished and in 1817 his son finally entered into a formal partnership with the Perry family (they eventually merged to become Perry & Co. in 1820). Messrs. Parker and Perry enjoyed the patronage of King and Court, ranging from George, Prince of Wales to William Beckford; indeed in George Perry's own words of 1835 he boasted, 'We trust that our having made the greater part of the lustres for the late King, and our being now employed in making those for the new Palace of his present Majesty [William IV], will be some guarantee for the character of our Manufacture.' Amongst the best documented Parker commissions is that of the Dukes of Devonshire for both Chatsworth, circa 1782-3, and Devonshire House, London in the 1820's and 1830's.

    A closely related twenty-light chandelier with ten glass spires, originally suppplied to the Earl of Lincoln for Clumber Park, Nottinghamshire and subsequently owned by Nancy Lancaster at both Kelmarsh Hall and Ditchley Park, is discussed in Mortimer, op. cit., p.103, whilst a directly comparable chandelier is in the Winterthur Museum (ibid, col. pls. 10-11). A further example, reputedly made for the Russian market and also subsequently bought by Nancy Lancaster for Ditchley Park, was sold by the Administrators of Polly Peck International, Phillips, London, 12 February 1991, lot 137 (£126,500).

    Provenance

    The collection of S. Eckman, Jr., Esq., C.B.E., of The Old Rectory, Little Bookham and 1, Wilton Crescent, London; Sotheby's, London, 6 October 1967, lot 58 (2000 gns. to Norman Adams).
    with Norman Adams, London and sold to the following collector in 1977.
    Anonymous sale ('50 Years of Collecting'); Christie's, London, 14 May 2003, lot 261.