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    Sale 7561

    Simon Sainsbury The Creation of an English Arcadia

    18 June 2008, London, King Street

  • Lot 270

    A GEORGE III MAHOGANY TRIPOD TABLE

    CIRCA 1774, DESIGNED BY THOMAS CHIPPENDALE, MADE BY JOHN WALKER AND CARVED BY CHRISTOPHER THEAKSTONE

    Price Realised  

    A GEORGE III MAHOGANY TRIPOD TABLE
    CIRCA 1774, DESIGNED BY THOMAS CHIPPENDALE, MADE BY JOHN WALKER AND CARVED BY CHRISTOPHER THEAKSTONE
    The circular tip-up top on a gadrooned baluster shaft and moulded, imbricated and guilloche-carved cabriole tripod base with claw-and-ball feet
    28 in. (71 cm.) high; 50 in. (127 cm.) diameter


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    The Harewood accounts contain two payments which relate to this table, one concerning '4 Mahogany tea Tables £3.18.0' (14 Jan. 1774) to John Walker, a local joiner and another 'Carved work done at Harewood House for Edwin Lascelles Esq. by Christopher Theakstone' detailed as: 'Carving a Set of Feet for round table with lion feet £0.18.0
    A Do with Eagles feet & the Mouldings enriched £1.10.0
    A Do with Scrole feet a rafled leaf and Mouldings enriched £1. 5.0
    A Do with plain Scrole foot and the mouldings enriched £0.10.0
    A Do with Eagles feet & the mouldings enriched £1.10.0'


    The second on this list corresponds to the Sainsbury table. The third and fourth remain at Harewood, and the first and fifth were sold at Christie's London, 1 April 1976, lots 47-48. Amongst a group of seven recently discovered full-size working drawings almost certainly by Chippendale (Gilbert, op.cit. fig. 464), there are two which correspond almost exactly to the two tables still at Harewood. This is the first evidence that Chippendale provided designs for provincial craftsmen.

    HAREWOOD HOUSE AND CHIPPENDALE

    The Lascelles family's connection with Harewood - that great Treasure house of the North - began in 1738 when Henry Lascelles bought the Gawthorpe Hall estate near Leeds. An old-fashioned, medieval manor house, Gawthorpe was razed to the ground in 1754 by his son and heir, Edwin, who embarked on an ambitious building programme to erect a new Harewood, commensurate with his vast inheritance acquired from the family's sugar plantations in Barbados. Initially turning to the local architect John Carr of York, the latter was subsequently succeeded by the young and ambitious Scot, Robert Adam. Their great Palladian collusion was largely complete on the outside by 1765, when it was depicted on an ice-pail made by Wedgwood for the service of Catherine the Great of Russia.

    Adam's palatial interiors, embellished with plasterwork by Joseph Rose and decorative paintings by Antonio Zucchi and Angelica Kauffmann, took more than three decades to reach their zenith but provided the perfect backdrop for Chippendale's most important commission. Born only a few miles away at Otley, Thomas Chippendale Senior (d.1778) and, subsequently his son, Thomas Junior worked at Harewood between 1767 and 1797. A multiplicity of chairs, sofas, stools, tables, beds, commodes, looking glasses and upholstery were made for not only the State Rooms, but also for the family apartments, basements and servant's quarters, to create 'one of the best and compleatest Houses in the Kingdom'.

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    Supplied to Edwin Lascelles, Lord Harewood (1712-1795), Harewood House, Yorkshire.
    Thence by descent at Harewood with the Earls of Harewood, sold Christie's London, 1 April 1976, lot 49.


    Literature

    C. Gilbert, The Life and Work of Thomas Chippendale, 1978, p. 203 and fig. 468