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    Sale 7727

    Important English Furniture and Clocks

    4 June 2009, London, King Street

  • Lot 104

    A PAIR OF REGENCY GILTWOOD ARMCHAIRS

    ATTRIBUTED TO MOREL & HUGHES, CIRCA 1805

    Price Realised  

    A PAIR OF REGENCY GILTWOOD ARMCHAIRS
    ATTRIBUTED TO MOREL & HUGHES, CIRCA 1805
    Each with a padded scrolled back, the curved toprail between moulded downswept arms with scroll and paterae terminals, on reeded tapering legs headed by paterae with gadrooned feet, with gadrooned brass caps and castors, stamped 'W', one chair with 'II' inscribed in pencil on the backrail, redecorated
    36 in. (91.5 cm.) high; 23¼ in. (59 cm.) wide; 27 in. (68 cm.) deep (2)


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    These elegant squab-cushioned drawing-room chairs, with reeded, palm-flowered and Grecian-scrolled frames, epitomise the 'antique' fashion introduced around 1800 by George, Prince of Wales, later George IV under the guidance of his French 'Upholsterer-in Ordinary' Nicholas Morel (d. 1830). The Great Marlborough Street cabinet-maker and upholsterer entered into his celebrated partnership with Robert Hughes around 1805, and these chairs may have formed part of the suite designed at this period by Morel for the Hanover Square mansion of Edward, Lord Lascelles, later 1st Earl of Harewood (d. 1820). Payments to Messrs Morel and Hughes are recorded in Lord Lascelles' accounts for March 1809 (P. Macquoid, op. cit., fig. 243).

    The chair-pattern appears to evolve from that of a palm-wrapped drawing-room suite, that Morel is likely to have provided for Southill, Bedfordshire, during the period he was employed by Samuel Whitbread II from 1798 to 1813 (F. Collard, Regency Furniture, 1985, p. 44). The latter have also been compared to Morel's 'antique' style seat furniture supplied in 1806 for Weston Park, Staffordshire (P. Rogers, 'The Remodelling of Weston Park', Furniture History, 1987, pp. 11-34, and fig. 6).
    An unupholstered and undecorated armchair from the Harewood suite was sold by the Earl of Harewood, in these Rooms, 15 November 1990, lot 48, and another probably from the suite, was sold anonymously, Christie's New York, 12 October 1996, lot 85. A pair was sold anonymously, Christie's, London, 29 November 2001, lot 181 (£17,625).

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    Possibly part of the suite supplied to Edward Lascelles, 1st Earl of Harewood (d. 1820) for Harewood House, Hanover Square, London and by descent until offered by H.R.H. The Princess Royal and the Earl of Harewood, Christie's London, 28 June 1951, lot 46 (the whole suite).


    Literature

    For the Harewood House suite:
    P. Macquoid, A History of English Furniture, The Age of Satinwood, London, 1908, fig. 243.
    C. Hussey, English Country Houses, Mid-Georgian 1760-1800, London, 1956, p. 66, fig. 116.