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    Sale 2622

    Important Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art

    3 December 2008, Hong Kong

  • Lot 2534

    A RARE PAIR OF HUANGHUALI TEMPLE-FORM SHRINES

    Price Realised  

    A RARE PAIR OF HUANGHUALI TEMPLE-FORM SHRINES
    QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY

    Each shrine of architectural form and impressive size, raised on a base with low feet and curvilinear apron, the main body of rectangular shape to house a statute, opening at the front with four hinged doors decorated with openwork panels of chi dragon design, the porch set below a vaulted roof and open fretwork carved with chi dragons, a three-panel eave and additional pierced panels of similar stylised dragon design between the round front posts and short struts, the doors and front posts divided by a stretcher on both sides below the roof with a dragon roundel, and five openwork railings set between the front and the sides above the base
    47 x 31 1/8 x 26 3/8 in. (119.4 x 79 x 67 cm.) high (2)


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    Most Chinese homes once contained shrines to household deities who had specific domestic or heavenly terrain. Daily or seasonal veneration of these spirits, as well as Buddhist, Taoist, and ancestral worthies, assured temporal worlds would be maintained. The current pair of huanghuali temple-form shrines of substantial size would have been made for an affluent household. When the doors were open, it could hold statutes of deity or tablets commemorating family members and offering of fruit or bowls of rice.

    Compare with another huanghuali example illustrated by R.H. Hatfield et al., Chinese Furniture: One Hundred Examples from the Mimi and Raymond Hung Collection, New York, 1996, pp. 238-9, no. 98.

    Pre-Lot Text

    THE PROPERTY OF A LADY