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    Sale 12455

    European Furniture & Works of Art

    6 July 2016, London, King Street

  • Lot 51

    A REGENCE ORMOLU-MOUNTED KINGWOOD AND PARQUETRY COMMODE

    ATTRIBUTED TO ETIENNE DOIRAT, CIRCA 1725, PROBABLY RETAILED BY PIERRE MIGEON

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A REGENCE ORMOLU-MOUNTED KINGWOOD AND PARQUETRY COMMODE
    ATTRIBUTED TO ETIENNE DOIRAT, CIRCA 1725, PROBABLY RETAILED BY PIERRE MIGEON
    The shaped Rouge Royal marble top above a framed frieze drawer with figural handles and two drawers decorated sans traverse centred with a cartouche comprising a lambrequin, scrolling acanthus foliage and feathers, the escutcheon with dolphins and paw feet, within a shaped gadrooned frame, the front angles surmounted by a male and female figures à l'Indienne, the sides with rosettes, on shell-shaped feet, stamped twice 'MIGEON' and 'JME'
    34 ¼ in. (87 cm.) high; 52 ¼ in. (133 cm.) wide; 25 ½ in. (65 cm.) deep


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    This superb commode, decorated with beautifull-chased ormolu mounts against a bold parquetry in striking kingwood veneers, is part of a small group of related commodes that are attributed to Etienne Doirat (d. 1732).

    Its audacious form with splayed supports is characteristic of his late work - a phase described by J. -D. Augarde as ‘son ultime chef-d’oeuvre ‘- and is closely related to the similarly mounted and shaped commode stamped by Doirat which is now in the Getty Museum (J. -D. Augarde, 'Etienne Doirat, Menuisier en Ebène’, The J. Paul Getty Museum Journal, vol. 13, 1985, p. 45, fig. 4; no. 72.DA.66). Both commodes are enriched with the same central cartouche and large escutcheon decorated with dolphins, lambrequin and paw feet. The sculptural male and female figures à l'Indienne visible on these commodes seem to be a unique feature of his work. Another commode, now in a private collection, stamped by Doirat, sold at Sotheby’s, Monaco, 24 June 1984, lot 3135, of almost identical shape also shares identical features including the superb croisillon parquetry, the gadrooned framing, the scrolling foliate handles, the large rosettes to the sides and the shell-shaped feet.
    Interestingly, the inventory following his death in 1732, published by J.-D. Augarde, op. cit., pp. 33-52, reveals an extensive quantity of ormolu mounts, including mounts listed as unchased. Therefore it seems that Doirat retained exclusive use of his models for mount, which reinforces the attribution of the present commode to the cabinet maker.

    Etienne Doirat (1675-1732) was one of the most important and talented ébénistes of the Régence period. He is recorded in the Grand-Rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine at the time of his marriage in 1704. In 1726 he set up his workshop in the Cour de la Contrescarpe des Fossées de la Bastille, and in 1731 leased a store in the fashionable rue Saint-Honoré, one of Paris' foremost addresses for luxury retailers.
    The stamps ‘MIGEON’ applied later to the present commode could probably be explained by the known link between the Doirat and Migeon families. On Doirat’s death in 1732 his son-in-law, Louis-Simon Painsun, took over the responsibility of the business and of his stock. His stamp ‘L.S.P.’ appears side by side with Migeon’s stamp on some pieces, which indicates he must have supplied furniture to Migeon, including pieces from his father-in-law’s stock.

    In 1913, this commode was sold from the collection of the celebrated amateur Eugène Kraemer in Paris, when it was acquired by the American philanthropist and collector Ogden Mills (1857-1929) for his residence in Paris, 73 rue de Varenne. Inherited by his daughter, Beatrice, the celebrated heiress Countess of Granard (1883-1972), it has remained in the family until the present day.

    Provenance

    Eugène Kraemer Collection, sold Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 5-6 May 1913, lot 141.
    Acquired by the philanthropist and collector Ogden Mills (1857-1929) for his residence in Paris, 73 rue de Varenne.
    Inherited by his daughter, Beatrice, Countess of Granard (1883-1972).
    Thence by descent.


    Pre-Lot Text

    Property of a Lady of Title (lots 4, 6, 25, 51, 75)