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    Sale 2109

    Property From The Collection OF George & Lesley Schoedinger

    18 January 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 480

    A Set of Six Painted Windsor Armchairs

    RHODE ISLAND-CONNECTICUT BORDER REGION, 1790-1800

    Price Realised  

    A Set of Six Painted Windsor Armchairs
    Rhode Island-Connecticut border region, 1790-1800
    36 in. high, 18½ in. wide, 14¾ in. deep (6)


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    Surviving as a set of six and with their old painted surfaces, these armchairs are a rare and important document of New England Windsor chairmaking. Their slender turnings and deeply sculpted seats illustrate practices favored along the Rhode Island-Connecticut border during the late eighteenth century. While lacking collarless turnings on the upper arm supports and legs, a similar chair is thought to have been made in Montreal and, as discussed by Nancy Goyne Evans, was likely made by a craftsman trained in the Rhode Island-Connecticut region (Nancy Goyne Evans, American Windsor Chairs (Winterthur, DE, 1996), pp. 655-666, fig. 8-43; David H. Conradsen, Useful Beauty: Early American Decorative Arts from St. Louis Collections (St. Louis, 1999), p. 39).

    Provenance

    Nathan Liverant and Son, Colchester, Connecticut, 1995


    Literature

    David H. Conradsen, Useful Beauty: Early American Decorative Arts from St. Louis Collections (St. Louis, 1999), p. 38, fig. 13.


    Exhibited

    St. Louis, Missouri, Saint Louis Art Museum, Useful Beauty: Early American Decorative Arts from St. Louis Collections, June 19 to August 15, 1999.