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    Sale 7466

    Le Goût Steinitz, III

    6 December 2007, London, King Street

  • Lot 391

    A SILVERED BRONZE-MOUNTED ENGRAVED-IVORY PADOUK AND SIMULATED ROSEWOOD CLOTHES-PRESS

    THE DOORS AND DRAWERS INDIAN, VIZAGAPATAM, MID-18TH CENTURY, RECONSTRUCTED IN ENGLAND IN THE LATE 18TH 19TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    A SILVERED BRONZE-MOUNTED ENGRAVED-IVORY PADOUK AND SIMULATED ROSEWOOD CLOTHES-PRESS
    THE DOORS AND DRAWERS INDIAN, VIZAGAPATAM, MID-18TH CENTURY, RECONSTRUCTED IN ENGLAND IN THE LATE 18TH 19TH CENTURY
    Of rectangular shape, the upper section with trailing foliate moulding and plain pediment above two hinged doors profusely inlaid with bamboo shoots framed by trailing lotus and floral sprays within a leafy branch surround, concealing an interior fitted with five open sliding trays, the lower section fitted with two drawers sans traverse with conforming engraved floral and foliate border mounted with pierced rocaille handles, the plain sides stained to simulate rosewood, and terminating on shaped bracket feet, the front of which veneered with engraved ivory depicting further floral sprays
    85¾ in. (218 cm.) high; 49½ in. (126 cm.) wide; 25¼ in. (64 cm.) deep


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    Vizagapatam, a port to the north of the Eastern Coromandel coast of India, was renowned from the late seventeenth century for its craftsmens' skilled inlaying and veneering of ivory over wooden carcasses. The intricate designs produced there were aligned to Western forms and often engraved with Western scenes. Furniture and objects manufactured in Vizagapatam were considered luxury goods and retailed in Madras and Calcutta. Their popularity spread further by examples brought back to England by leading officials of the East India Company such as Clive of India and Warren Hastings. This clothes-press, whilst incorporating Indian mid-18th century engraved-ivory panels, was probably reconstructed in England in the late 18th century, using oak and pine for its carcase. The borders of densely scrolling foliage relate to several pieces dated to the mid-18th century and illustrated in A. Jaffer, Furniture from British India and Ceylon, London, 2001, pp. 187-193, nos. 40-42. The present clothes-press shows the combination of both ivory inlay and engraved-ivory veneers, representing the transitional phase between the earlier wholly-inlaid technique and the fashion for veneering a piece in its entirety, common to the later 18th century.

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