• Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 7586

    West ~ East - The Niall Hobhouse Collection

    22 May 2008, London, King Street

  • Lot 379

    A VICTORIAN OAK LINEN PRESS

    CIRCA 1870, ATTRIBUTED TO HOLLAND & SONS

    Price Realised  

    A VICTORIAN OAK LINEN PRESS
    CIRCA 1870, ATTRIBUTED TO HOLLAND & SONS
    With eight linen-fold cupboard doors enclosing adjustable shelves, with various chalk inscriptions to the reverse
    98 in. (249 cm.) high; 81 in. (206 cm.) wide; 21¾ in. (55 cm.) deep


    Contact Client Service
    • info@christies.com

    • New York +1 212 636 2000

    • London +44 (0)20 7839 9060

    • Hong Kong +852 2760 1766

    • Shanghai +86 21 6355 1766

    The oak wardrobe/clothes press, with Elizabethan linen-folds and florid gothic ornament, derives from the Victorian New Palace of Westminster style invented in the 1840s by A.W.N. Pugin (d. 1856), architect and author of Gothic Furniture in the style of the 15th century, 1835. A related Westminster Palace bookcase and cabinet, dated to the early 1850s, are illustrated in M.H. Port's, The Houses of Parliament, London, 1976 (figs. 189 and 193); while a related clothes-press design featured in the 1852 Estimate Book (Westminster Library) of Messrs Gillow, whose tender for furnishing the House of Commons had been accepted in the previous year. However, The House of Lords tender was granted in 1856 to the Mount Street firm of Messrs Holland & Son, who had been involved in the Palace furnishings since the early 1830s. The present wardrobe appears to be the one featured in 1920 in the 1st Duke of Westminster's Tower Bedroom at Eaton Hall, Cheshire, which was fitted up in the 1870s by Messrs Holland & Sons (see 'Eaton Hall, Cheshire', Country Life, XLVII, 1920; and the bedroom photograph illustrated in Christie's Woburn sale catalogue, September 2004, p. 440).

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    Almost certainly Hugh Lupus Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster
    (d.1899) for Eaton Hall, Cheshire until removed to
    Bourdon House, Davies Street, London for Lady Grosvenor.