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    Sale 2269

    Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art Including Jades from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

    19 March 2009, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 640

    A ZITAN FOOTSTOOL, JIAOTA

    18TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    A ZITAN FOOTSTOOL, JIAOTA
    18TH CENTURY
    The two-plank top set within the rectangular frame with beaded 'ice-plate' edge above a plain beaded apron continuing to the thick legs of slightly rounded square section terminating in hoof feet
    6 5/8 in. (16.8 cm.) high, 33 15/16 in. (86.2 cm.) wide, 15 7/16 in. (39.2 cm.) deep


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    Foot stools have been used in association with a wide array of furniture, including chairs, couches, painting tables, beds and thrones. See Wan Yi, et. al., Daily Life in the Forbidden City, Hong Kong, 1985, p. 128, no. 175, for an in situ photograph of the Emperor's bedroom in the Hall of Mental Cultivation, where one can see a foot stool of considerable size used in conjunction with a platform-bed. Compare, also, the larger example sold in The Imperial Sale in our Hong Kong rooms, 27 May 2008, lot 1564.

    Provenance

    Acquired in Beijing between 1911-51, and thence by descent within the family to the present owner.


    Pre-Lot Text

    PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE AMERICAN COLLECTION

    Lots 640-47 are from the personal furniture collection of an American couple who resided in Beijing from 1911 through the end of World War II. This pioneering family not only owned an antique business, but also a carpet factory and ten rental residences, all located in Beijing and which were furnished with Chinese works of art they had collected. After the war, these residences, and many of the items housed within, were assigned to foreign embassies. Fortunately, the couple was able to successfully retain their personal art collection and relocate to Hong Kong in 1952, where they and their children continued to add to their outstanding collection of Chinese furniture and works of art.

    Ceramics and bronzes from this prominent collection are featured as lots 541, 545, 618-19, 689, 708, 715-17, 726, 729, 733, 737 and 775.