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    Sale 7813

    Glin Castle - A Knight in Ireland

    7 May 2009, London, King Street

  • Lot 13

    AN IRISH GEORGE II MAHOGANY SIDE TABLE

    CIRCA 1750, MODIFIED CIRCA 1830 WITH CARVING ADDED TO THE SIDES

    Price Realised  

    AN IRISH GEORGE II MAHOGANY SIDE TABLE
    CIRCA 1750, MODIFIED CIRCA 1830 WITH CARVING ADDED TO THE SIDES
    The moulded rectangular top with a shelf on a raised dotted pierced trellis, the frieze carved with the crest of Creagh of Counties Cork and Clare, and pierced scrolling foliage flowerheads, oak leaves and wheat-sheaves, on cabriole legs headed by acanthus masks with claw-and-ball feet, the back legs rectangular but apparently original, inscribed 'Geffenes ?' and 'Mrs Jackson' in chalk, extended in depth when the raised sup erstructure (originally further forward) was rotated
    35½ in. (89.5 cm.) high; 64¼ in. (163 cm.) wide; 29½ in. (75 cm.) deep


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    This grand armorial serving-table with the arms of the Creagh family belongs to a group of large serving-tables, all in the same slightly naive style, which are likely to have been made in Limerick or Cork, rather than in the capital, Dublin. Like the FitzMaurice table, still in the hall at Glin Castle (Irish Furniture, fig. 148), it has a shelf towards the back for the display of silver plate; however, whilst that on the FitzMaurice table is sloping, the shelf on the Creagh table is of pierced fretwork, a characteristic Irish motif. This has subsequently been rotated and moved backwards, presumably around 1820-40, when the rather more florid carving to the side rails was also added; presumably originally the sides would have been plain, as are the sides of the writing-cabinet made for George St. George (d.1762) of Woodsgift, Kilkenny (see lot 56). The acanthus leaf carving on the legs, the rope and the dotted trellis ground are typical of mid-18th Century Irish tables as is the carved apron with its profusion of flowers and foliage symbolizing abundance. However, it departs from the norm with its human masks bearded with acanthus. This is a feature of the group: the FitzMaurice table has lion masks; the Ballynagarde table has mythical Green Men and the Lincolne table has male masks (Irish Furniture, figs. 148-151, cat. no. 121). All are likely to have been executed by the same cabinet-maker, possibly in Limerick.

    The Creaghs, whose coat-of-arms appears on this table, were a well-known landed gentry family with substantial land holdings in Counties Cork and Clare.

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    Supplied to the Creagh Family of Co. Cork and Co. Clare, Ireland.
    Mrs Jackson.
    Acquired from Christopher Gibbs, London.


    Literature

    Glin & Peill, Irish Furniture, 2007, p. 114, fig. 149 & 150.