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    Sale 2605

    Asian Contemporary Art (Day Sale)

    25 May 2008, Hong Kong

  • Lot 611

    LEE HO RYON

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    LEE HO RYON
    (Born in 1978)
    Overlapping Image 080201 & Overlapping Image 080202
    signed, titled and dated 'Lee, Ho-Ryon; Overlapping Image; 2008' in Korean & English (on reverse)
    oil on canvas
    130.3 x 194 cm. (51 3/8 x 76 3/8 in.) & 162 x 112 cm. (63 3/4 x 44 in.) Painted in 2008 (2)


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    The images of musical succession are captured in adroit technical aptitude to provoke an immediate optical illusion of a motion picture. Through the playful arcane allusion of his character's movements, Lee Ho Ryon induces the audience to marvel in the liminal gap between the lagged movements of images, honing the viewer's awareness of their present existence and the shift in society's mind-set towards beauty from external facet to the internal soul.

    The two oeuvres are distinctively different as Overlapping Image 080201(Lot 611) is surprisingly more exposed of his mysterious protagonists in comparison to the Overlapping Image 080202 (Lot 611); however adeptly choosing to conceal the face, the emphasis in attention shifts directly to the depiction of phases of movement. His mastery of tackling and avoiding the narrative trait a compositional arrangement can bestow is apparent, particularly in Overlapping Image 080201, where the female is overtly disclosing her privacy with slight sexual insinuation is fitted in a compact space of the rectangular canvas. The Overlapping Image 080202 is also filled in monotony when perceived in purely artistic academicism, however, this preconception is overturned as the viewer realizes that this is only Lee's astute technical precondition in prior to his much deeper and genuine concerns. Impersonating the snap shot angle of a camera, the artist captures the moments of possibly embarrassing or exhibitionist characteristic of his women with highly skillful paint application, evoking a sense of hyperrealism, hence, inviting the viewer closer to sensorial reality. The snapshot angle, most definitely insinuates his female model's awareness of their being as an object of perception and preservation. Directed on the behavior of the body, the artist offers freedom to the figures to feel expressive without losing face in this society.

    Lee's sincerity in believing that the charm of today's women is their dignity in loving themselves is timidly, perhaps moreover confidently apparent on the expressive motion of his protagonists. Conscious of the power of gesture, Lee figuratively appropriates his own probity, indicating the evident transition in the society's outlook towards beauty with culture, however reminding us of the unchanged disorientation between 'conservative self-consciousness' of introversion and 'confident self-consciousness' of self-contentment desires to be praised for their beauty by others. This tug between the old fashioned thoughts that pull back today's permissive thoughts provoke an indecisiveness, hence the series of chaotically seductive layers.