• Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 2067

    Maritime Art

    3 December 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 120

    Stephen J. Renard (British, b. 1941)

    Britannia, Lulworth, Cambria and Candida on the Clyde

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    Stephen J. Renard (British, b. 1941)
    Britannia, Lulworth, Cambria and Candida on the Clyde
    signed 'Stephen J Renard' (lower right)
    oil on canvas
    18 x 27 in. (46 x 68.5 cm.)


    Contact Client Service
    • info@christies.com

    • New York +1 212 636 2000

    • London +44 (0)20 7839 9060

    • Hong Kong +852 2760 1766

    • Shanghai +86 21 6355 1766

    Britannia, arguably the most famous racing cutter of them all, was extremely successful throughout her long life and even though she was re-rigged seven times in all, her hull shape was so efficient that she remained competitive almost to the end. Starting with 33 wins in 39 races during her maiden season, she enjoyed two brilliant but quite separate careers under first, the Prince of Wales (1893-97), and then his son, King George V, after 1921. The latter grew so attached to her that, under the terms of his will, she was scuttled after his death in 1936 following the removal of all her salvageable gear.

    Lulworth was designed and built by White Bros. at Itchen in 1920 and registered at 123 tons gross (186 Thames). Originally called Terpsichore, she changed her name when acquired by Alexander Paton and it was under his ownership that she really excelled.

    Candida and Cambria were both rated at 23-metres and were completed within a year of each other in response to a slight change in the International Rules. Candida, owned by the banker Hermann Andreae, was designed by Charles Nicholson and build by Camper & Nicholson at Gosport in 1929. Carrying pennant K8, she was registered at 174 tons tm. and measured 98 feet in length with a 20 foot beam.
    Cambria, 162 ton tm. was designed and built by William Fife at Fairlie in 1928 and she was owned by Sir William Berry, later Viscount Camrose, the proprietor of the Daily Telegraph newspaper. Astra, another Camper & Nicholson boat of 1928, carried pennant K2 and was owned by Sir Mortimer Singer, K.B.E., J.P. Slightly lighter than her competitors in the above scene, she was registered at 164 tons tm. although her dimensions were broadly similar to the other yachts. Lulworth was designed and build by White Bros. at Itchen and registered at 186 tons tm. Originally named Terpsichore, she changed her name when acquired by Alexander Paton and it was under his ownership that she really excelled. All four boats depicted here were classic examples of the Bermudian rig whch brought such excitement to international racing in the early 1930's.