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    Sale 12241

    Art of the Islamic and Indian Worlds

    20 October 2016, London, King Street

  • Lot 1

    THE ACCESSION OF BOGHRA KHAN IN KASHGAR

    TIMURID HERAT, AFGHANISTAN, CIRCA 1425

    Price Realised  

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    THE ACCESSION OF BOGHRA KHAN IN KASHGAR
    TIMURID HERAT, AFGHANISTAN, CIRCA 1425
    From the Majma' al-Tawarikh of Hafiz-i Abru, opaque pigments on paper, the verso with 33ll. of neat black naskh, important words and phrases in red
    Painting 6½ x 8 7/8in. (16.5 x 22.5cm.); folio 16 3/8 x 11¾in. (41.6 x 29.8cm.)


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    The text below this painting relates the story of how Boghra Khan was married to an extremely intelligent woman called Bayra Khatun, to whom he was devoted. After her sudden death, Boghra Khan was inconsolable and the magnates of the empire decided to raise his middle son Quri Tekin to the throne. The text of the Majma' al-Tawarikh is lifted straight out of Rashid al-Din's history of the Oghuz in the Jami' al-Tawarikh (for a translation see Eddie Austerlitz, History of the Ogus, 1994, pp.89-90).

    Pre-Lot Text

    PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF EMILY A. WINGERT

    These folios come from the Majma’ al-Tawarikh, or ‘Assembly of Histories’, written by the historian Hafiz-i Abru at the court of the Timurid ruler Shah Rukh between 1423 and 1425. The manuscript from which our folios come is closely related to a holograph copy now in the Topkapi Saray Library in Istanbul (H.1653) which was copied for Baysunghur, the son of Shah Rukh on 6 Muharram AH 829/18 November 1425 AD. Stylistically the two manuscripts are so close that it is presumed that they were produced by a single group of artists in the royal atelier in Herat. The manuscript was largely copied from Rashid al-Din’s famous Jami al-Tawarikh and the pictorial style is slightly archaic for the early 15th century – harking back to that of the Rashid al-Din manuscripts.

    Three folios from this manuscript, from the Yale University Art Gallery, were recently exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the Court and Cosmos exhibition (Sheila Canby, Deniz Beyazit, Martina Rugiardi and A.C.S. Peacock, Court and Cosmos. The Great Age of the Seljuqs, exhibition catalogue, New York, 2016, no.2a-c, pp.48-49). Others are in museum collections across the world including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the David Collection, the collection of Prince and Princess Sadruddin Aga Khan, the Chester Beatty Library, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Cincinnati Art Museum and the Cleveland Museum of Art. Folios have also appeared on the art market - most recently at Sotheby’s, 22 April 2015, lot 124 and in these Rooms, 25 April 2013, lots 90, 91 and 92.