• Art of the Islamic and Indian  auction at Christies

    Sale 7843

    Art of the Islamic and Indian Worlds

    13 April 2010, London, King Street

  • Lot 289

    THE RELUCTANT DEPARTING LOVER

    KANGRA OR GULER, CIRCA 1800

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    THE RELUCTANT DEPARTING LOVER
    KANGRA OR GULER, CIRCA 1800
    Gouache heightened with gold on paper, a woman dressed in lavish orange gold-embroidered robes reluctantly leaves her lover who reclines on a divan his arm propping up his turbaned head and his hand holding on to the end of her veil, on the floor a gold hookah and a number of other vessels, around them an architectural setting, the miniature of ovoid format, the cream spandrels with polychrome floral decoration, black and gold border and pink margins
    Miniature 8 3/8 x 5 5/8in. (21.2 x 14.5cm.)


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    In the mid 18th century as Northern India was shaken by the invasion of Nadir Shah (1739) and the subsequent incursions by Ahmad Shah Abdali, a unlikely development in the arts took place in the Punjab Hills. Under the patronage of Raja Govardhan Chand (1744-1773) in Haripur-Guler, asylum was given to refugee artists trained in the Mughal style of painting. Thus developed the Kangra style, where artists adopted themes from the love poetry of Jayadeva, Bihari and Keshav Das and where miniatures were suffused with romantic love and bhakti mysticism (M.S. Randhawa, Kangra Paintings on Love, New Delhi, 1962, p. 19).

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    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium, which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Literature

    Patrick Carré, Dieux, tigres et amours. Miniatures indiennes du XVe au XXe siècle, Spain, 1993, pp.64-65