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    Sale 12975

    Noble & Private Collections Part I

    2 November 2016, London, King Street

  • Lot 96

    A MADRID CARPET

    REAL FÁBRICA DE TAPICES, SPAIN, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A MADRID CARPET
    REAL FÁBRICA DE TAPICES, SPAIN, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
    15ft.1in. x 13ft.10in. (458cm. x 420cm.)


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    Specified lots (sold and unsold) marked with a filled square not collected from Christie’s by 5.00 pm on the day of the sale will, at our option, be removed to Cadogan Tate. Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent offsite. Our removal and storage of the lot is subject to the terms and conditions of storage which can be found at Christies.com/storage and our fees for storage are set out in the table. These will apply whether the lot remains with Christie’s or is removed elsewhere. If the lot is transferred to Cadogan Tate, it will be available for collection from 12 noon on the second business day following the sale. If the lot remains at Christie’s it will be available for collection on any working day 9.00am to 5.00pm. Lots are not available for collection at weekends.


    Pre-Lot Text

    PROPERTY FROM THE STUYCK FAMILY COLLECTION, MADRID (LOTS 96-99)

    The crowning of Philip V (r.1700–1746) not only marked the founding of the Bourbon dynasty, it also brought about a significant cultural and artistic shift within Spain (Valérie Bérinstain et al., Great Carpets of the World, Paris, 1996, p.332). The grandson of Louis XIV of France (r.1643-1715), Philip was raised in the court of Versailles and brought many of its principals to his new kingdom. Alongside a host of artists from across Europe, the weaver Jacobo van der Goten and his sons were summoned to Madrid and tasked by Philip to establish the Real Fábrica de Tapices in 1721, later known as the Real Fábrica de Tapices y Alfombras (Sarah B. Sherrill, Carpets and rugs of Europe and America, New York, 1996, p.53). In 1786 Livinio Stuyck y van der Goten was drafted in to manage the factory and the Stuyck family have been at the helm ever since (ibid, Sarah B. Sherrill, 1996, p.53). Since the beginning of the 19th century the factory has predominantly produced knotted-pile carpets employing the symmetrical and single-wefted knot with designs that expertly echo both the exuberance and decadence of Neoclassicism, these carpets were commissioned for many of Spain's grandest buildings.